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Thread: Why Is The Moon Not Spinning Then?

  1. #521
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    The idea of a supermagnetic effect of solid metallic hydrogen deposited by comets could explain why the Moon is currently shown to be receding from the Earth at around 3.7cm/year.

  2. #522
    Quote Originally Posted by common_sense_seeker View Post
    You make a good point James R but one must read between the lines a little for a complete understanding.
    Why must one read between the lines? Why not take what is written at face value? You sound like a conspiracy theorist.

    Obviously the point he makes is a sensible one but considering all the evidence together combined with JPL's own admission that something is looking 'wrong' with their assumptions, the implications are indeed monumental.
    Maybe you're assuming that the the "problem" is more monumental than it really is.

  3. #523
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    The latest and final piece of the jigsaw is dark matter comets imo. One must anticipate the fall of Einstein's relativity to appreciate this new angle of enquiry. These anisotropic super-material impacts are the reason for orbital resonance. It would also explain the magnetised lunar rocks and the extra acceleration experienced by the lunar lander which caused it to overshoot it's designated landing site.

    I'm convinced that the moon will eventually start to move towards the Earth in it's orbit, which is the origin of the Pervasive Millennial-Scale Cycle in North Atlantic Holocene and Glacial Climates of 1,470 years. This tidal increase will dramatically affect the climate and push warmer equatorial waters towards the poles. This extra energy will have the effect of stirring up nutrients and bringing them to the surface, creating a wildlife boom.

    I even envisage the warm Pacific current being diverted further north so that it passes over the sill of the Bering Strait into the Arctic basin. This is the origin of the megafauna abundance in the high arctic. It underpins the timing of the Heinrich events, with the tidal surge and change of current flow undercutting the glaciers and the warmer precipitation leading to flow steams under the ice.

  4. #524
    Like nailing Jello to a tree AlexG's Avatar
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    Woo-woo

  5. #525
    Quote Originally Posted by common_sense_seeker View Post
    The latest and final piece of the jigsaw is dark matter comets imo. One must anticipate the fall of Einstein's relativity to appreciate this new angle of enquiry. These anisotropic super-material impacts are the reason for orbital resonance. It would also explain the magnetised lunar rocks and the extra acceleration experienced by the lunar lander which caused it to overshoot it's designated landing site..
    How do they tie in with the Dartmoor hyraxes?

  6. #526
    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite View Post
    How do they tie in with the Dartmoor hyraxes?
    Must be Genetic Engineering gone wrong.

  7. #527
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    Both are two big holes in our understanding as a global species.

  8. #528
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    Check out these photographs of the moon's craters

    The dark comet tidal locking hypothesis would predict a greater number of craters on the side facing the Earth:

    Wikipedia:
    The two hemispheres have distinctly different appearances, with the near side covered in multiple, large maria (Latin for 'seas,' since the earliest astronomers incorrectly thought that these plains were seas of lunar water). The far side has a battered, densely cratered appearance with few maria. Only 1% of the surface of the far side is covered by maria,[2] compared to 31.2% on the near side. One commonly accepted explanation for this difference is related to a higher concentration of heat-producing elements on the near-side hemisphere, as has been demonstrated by geochemical maps obtained from the Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectrometer. While other factors such as surface elevation and crustal thickness could also affect where basalts erupt, these do not explain why the farside South Pole-Aitken basin (which contains the lowest elevations of the Moon and possesses a thin crust) was not as volcanically active as Oceanus Procellarum on the near side.

    Another factor in the large difference between the two hemispheres is that the near side has been shielded from impacts by the Earth via the synchronous rotation that keeps the far side exposed to impactors coming from outer space.

    It has also been proposed that the differences between the two hemispheres may have been caused by a collision with a smaller companion moon that also originated from the Theia collision.[3] In this model the impact led to an accretionary pile rather than a crater, contributing a hemispheric layer of extent and thickness that may be consistent with the dimensions of the farside highlands.
    This is in contradiction to the reality of more craters on the far side. This can be explained by the dark matter comets passing through the centre of the Moon and causing lava flows on the other side. These buried dark matter comets and their supermagnetic effects could be attributed to their entry crater to give an internal picture of their size, orientation and location as well as the structure and dynamics of the collision.

    The photos show slightly more north pole dark matter collisions compared to south pole. This is presumably due to our more southerly position in the Milky Way's spiral arm, the dark matter comets being produced from solar metastable metallic hydrogen released during supernova events.
    Last edited by common_sense_seeker; 11-16-11 at 08:18 AM.

  9. #529

    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by common_sense_seeker View Post
    Check out these photographs of the moon's craters

    The dark comet tidal locking hypothesis would predict a greater number of craters on the side facing the Earth:

    Wikipedia:
    This is in contradiction to the reality of more craters on the far side. This can be explained by the dark matter comets passing through the centre of the Moon and causing lava flows on the other side. These buried dark matter comets and their supermagnetic effects could be attributed to their entry crater to give an internal picture of their size, orientation and location as well as the structure and dynamics of the collision.

    The photos show slightly more north pole dark matter collisions compared to south pole. This is presumably due to our more southerly position in the Milky Way's spiral arm, the dark matter comets being produced from solar metastable metallic hydrogen released during supernova events.
    This must be a joke!

  10. #530
    Nope. Apparently giant hyraxes migrated from mercury to earth via dark matter comets.

    Course that was when the earth was gigantic.

  11. #531
    Penguinaciously duckalicious. Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by origin View Post
    Nope. Apparently giant hyraxes migrated from mercury to earth via dark matter comets.
    So, logically speaking, we should also find giant hyrax remains on the Moon when they crashed there causing the craters. Probably buried in the lava.
    (OMG! What if some of them survived and started a civilisation? Do you think technology-using giant hyraces are responsible for the anomalous "structures" seen on the Moon? And UFO stories? What if they're.... watching us right now?)

    Maybe there were laxer standards in those days for achieving your PDMCPL*.


    * Private Dark Matter Comet Pilot's Licence.

  12. #532
    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    So, logically speaking, we should also find giant hyrax remains on the Moon when they crashed there causing the craters. Probably buried in the lava.
    (OMG! What if some of them survived and started a civilisation? Do you think technology-using giant hyraces are responsible for the anomalous "structures" seen on the Moon? And UFO stories? What if they're.... watching us right now?)

    Maybe there were laxer standards in those days for achieving your PDMCPL*.


    * Private Dark Matter Comet Pilot's Licence.
    Any that landed on the moon turned to cheese - there's no atmosphere up there - silly.

    PS: Maybe it was "turned to custard".
    Last edited by Robittybob1; 11-16-11 at 01:13 PM. Reason: recipe

  13. #533
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    This must be a joke!
    lol. The Earth has more landmasses in the northern hemisphere which fits with the dark matter comet origins of our continents and also suggests they were made at different times in the distant past. This has huge implications for the dating of rocks and fossils for example.

  14. #534
    Quote Originally Posted by common_sense_seeker View Post
    lol. The Earth has more landmasses in the northern hemisphere which fits with the dark matter comet origins of our continents and also suggests they were made at different times in the distant past. This has huge implications for the dating of rocks and fossils for example.
    Er, why? What is the significance of the northern hemisphere? Space has no orientation.

  15. #535
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlogistician View Post
    Er, why? What is the significance of the northern hemisphere? Space has no orientation.
    It does have orientation w.r.t. comet impact directions. The Moon and Earth show that there's more comet impact events which originate from the northern regions of the cosmos. (Which I remember from my astronomy class)

  16. #536
    Quote Originally Posted by common_sense_seeker View Post
    It does have orientation w.r.t. comet impact directions. The Moon and Earth show that there's more comet impact events which originate from the northern regions of the cosmos. (Which I remember from my astronomy class)
    Citation please.

  17. #537
    Quote Originally Posted by common_sense_seeker View Post
    It does have orientation w.r.t. comet impact directions. The Moon and Earth show that there's more comet impact events which originate from the northern regions of the cosmos. (Which I remember from my astronomy class)
    The 'cosmos' does not have a 'northern region', Space has no orientation.

  18. #538
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...uiper_oort.jpg

    So, CSS is trying to say there's a statistical variation in the number of bodies in the 'northern' part of the Oort cloud is he? When they are in ORBIT? Er, how does that work, CSS?

  19. #539
    Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador common_sense_seeker's Avatar
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    There *is* a discrepency in the north/south distribution of craters in the solar sytem bodies:

    The southern hemisphere of Mars is predominantly ancient cratered highlands somewhat similar to the Moon. In contrast, most of the northern hemisphere consists of plains which are much younger, lower in elevation and have a much more complex history. An abrupt elevation change of several kilometers seems to occur at the boundary. The reasons for this global dichotomy and abrupt boundary are unknown (some speculate that they are due to a very large impact shortly after Mars' accretion). Mars Global Surveyor has produced a nice 3D map of Mars that clearly shows these features.
    I might have got it the wrong way round, but there *is* a marked difference.

    Edit - of course, more southerly impacts of dark matter comets which create magma plumes on the northern hemisphere of the Earth, which created the majority of the landmasses!

  20. #540
    Penguinaciously duckalicious. Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    That map appears to be inaccurate Phlog.
    The hyraces aren't mentioned...
    (Maybe it's out of date).

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