Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: Dangers of high pulse [230s and above]

  1. #1
    This sentence is a lie aaqucnaona's Avatar
    Posts
    1,644

    Unhappy Dangers of high pulse [230s and above]

    I am a traucer [frerunning/ parkour practitioner] and while bruises are common and training rules mean that serious injuries rarely happen, stresses on the body are dealt with exercise and stretching;
    But in and of itself, is a temporary high pulse dangerous in the long run? I have measured my pulse after a normal 3 minutes intense practise session and it usually is around 210-230. The highest ever was around 255. It normalises in less than 7-10 minutes. Should I worry?

    OMG! I miscalculated! Its around 190-210 and highest was 230s. Also normalisation was around 6 minutes. I did the calculations again with 10 second and 10x methos.
    Last edited by aaqucnaona; 12-15-11 at 02:26 AM.

  2. #2
    C'mon, get happy! chimpkin's Avatar
    Posts
    4,416
    Ask your GP.
    If you're young and athletic, and it's explained by intense activity, I don't think it's a problem...but double-check that.
    What's your resting pulse? ideal should be somewhere around 60-70...I usually tick around 70-80 though and I passed an EKG last year.
    Blood pressure ideal is 120 systolic, 60 diastolic.

  3. #3
    The field its covered in blood skaught's Avatar
    Posts
    4,092
    It highly depends on your age and how athletic you've been throughout your life. But I'd say 255 is not good! In fact, Id say anything above 200 is not good.

    As chimpkin said, you should really check with your Dr. But as a general rule, you can go by the target heart rate system which is:
    You take the number 210, subtract your age, and whatever number you get is the number you should not exceed. So If you are 20 yrs old, you would subtract 20 from 210 = 190. So 190 is 100% of your target heart rate, and its the number you shouldnt exceed unless you have been physically active for a long time and have worked up to getting it that high. To get a good cardio, you want to hit somewhere between 70% - 80% of your target heart rate. 90% is intense cardio, and 100%, like I said, isn't always good. Anything above it could be potentially dangerous.

  4. #4
    obscurely fossiliferous Stoniphi's Avatar
    Posts
    2,843
    I agree, 255 is too high, even if you are young and very athletic. If you are a long - term athlete your heart will be efficient enough to beat stronger at a lower rate. You are taking a significant risk if you are ramping it up that high IMHO. I would have that checked out by a doc myself.

  5. #5
    Bleed White and Blue! Shogun's Avatar
    Posts
    7,635
    No, it shouldn't be that high, and you should also have a fast recovery, try to cut it to no more than 4 minutes MAX recovery to normal, 7 is too much, 10 is...we won't go into that. Work on strengthening your cardio and maybe get yourself checked out.

    Try cardio exercises to increase your heart's strength. Maybe try to learn to control your heart rate, it'll help.

    Maybe you can deal with it now, because you done it all your life, maybe you just tough it out and think its normal. That mentality is awesome, but your heart rate isn't. Intense cardio while pushing yourself increase heart strength, too much can do damage. Just like any other workout. Like skaught said, 85-90% of your max heart rate is maximum for a beneficial workout, I try for that range when working on cardio.

    The more athletic you are, the slower your resting rate, exercise rate and recovery rate.

  6. #6
    Yes. You are either doing the math wrong. (count your pulse for six seconds and multiply by 10 is easiest.), or you have something wrong.

    Possibly bicuspid (only 2 heart valves). This is a common 1% heart defect, and would require at minimal a ultrasound to detect.

    I wouldn't panic, but I'd walk (not run) to your doctors office and schedule tests.

  7. #7
    The field its covered in blood skaught's Avatar
    Posts
    4,092
    Quote Originally Posted by kwhilborn View Post

    I wouldn't panic, but I'd walk (not run) to your doctors office and schedule tests.
    Luv it!

  8. #8
    This sentence is a lie aaqucnaona's Avatar
    Posts
    1,644
    Guys, guys, relax. I exercise, cycle, sprint, do parkour, stretch and even do occasional martial arts and have done so for at least since I was 8 [I am 17 now]. I am in quite good condition, touching 5'10" and 157 lbs. I was only asking if a healthy person has to worry about about 15 minutes of elevated heart rate every date. My rest pulse is around 73 but since I move about the house running/ jumping [except when we have guests, of course; wouldnt want to be recommended to a mental hospital, would I?] its around 80s most of the time. Its just a casual question, not a medical emergency.
    Btw, thanks for the advice on cardio, I have hardly paid any attention to it before.

  9. #9

  10. #10
    obscurely fossiliferous Stoniphi's Avatar
    Posts
    2,843
    Good link, Asguard.

    I am 61 years old and very athletic. I train daily to 165 beats per minute, my resting rate is 55 beats per minute. I note that this fits the 'least objectionable' formula on that page close enough.

  11. #11
    In a certain percentage of the population, vigorous aerobic exercise can lead to right ventricle damage regardless.

  12. #12

  13. #13
    Bleed White and Blue! Shogun's Avatar
    Posts
    7,635
    Quote Originally Posted by aaqucnaona View Post
    Guys, guys, relax. I exercise, cycle, sprint, do parkour, stretch and even do occasional martial arts and have done so for at least since I was 8 [I am 17 now]. I am in quite good condition, touching 5'10" and 157 lbs. I was only asking if a healthy person has to worry about about 15 minutes of elevated heart rate every date. My rest pulse is around 73 but since I move about the house running/ jumping [except when we have guests, of course; wouldnt want to be recommended to a mental hospital, would I?] its around 80s most of the time. Its just a casual question, not a medical emergency.
    Btw, thanks for the advice on cardio, I have hardly paid any attention to it before.
    That's great

    It's also great that you are active. Running and jumping is so much easier then walking eh? 6 minutes is good, but not great, I know you are very active at all, but try to go for about 3 or 4 minutes for recovery.

    Do cardio workouts, but if you want in addition, add in plyometrics. It really increases speed, power and explosiveness. Worked wonders for me in me, I'm 15 years old, 6'2" 180lbs , but thanks to plyometrics training, agility training and yoga (not real yoga, P90X yoga) for flexibility, I became as fast as smaller people. In fact, I became way quicker then when I was small.

  14. #14
    This sentence is a lie aaqucnaona's Avatar
    Posts
    1,644
    [QUOTE=Shogun;2875428]Running and jumping is so much easier then walking eh?QUOTE]

    LOL. Actually I am hibituated to Pk, so I usually take 6 steps to cover the 45 feet [not in straight line] from my room to the hall. Less steps = easier and also faster.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by aaqucnaona View Post
    I am a traucer [frerunning/ parkour practitioner] and while bruises are common and training rules mean that serious injuries rarely happen, stresses on the body are dealt with exercise and stretching;
    But in and of itself, is a temporary high pulse dangerous in the long run? I have measured my pulse after a normal 3 minutes intense practise session and it usually is around 210-230. The highest ever was around 255. It normalises in less than 7-10 minutes. Should I worry?

    OMG! I miscalculated! Its around 190-210 and highest was 230s. Also normalisation was around 6 minutes. I did the calculations again with 10 second and 10x methos.
    10 seconds? your joking right. NOONE uses 10 seconds. The least we will do is 15 seconds and that's only if they have a strong regular pulse which we have already checked and we are just checking to make sure nothings changed. If you want accuracy you have to count for the full min.

  16. #16
    This sentence is a lie aaqucnaona's Avatar
    Posts
    1,644
    Quote Originally Posted by Asguard View Post
    10 seconds? your joking right. NOONE uses 10 seconds. The least we will do is 15 seconds and that's only if they have a strong regular pulse which we have already checked and we are just checking to make sure nothings changed. If you want accuracy you have to count for the full min.
    https://market.android.com/details?i...eartrate&hl=en

    I now use this.

  17. #17
    Bleed White and Blue! Shogun's Avatar
    Posts
    7,635
    [QUOTE=aaqucnaona;2875764]
    Quote Originally Posted by Shogun View Post
    Running and jumping is so much easier then walking eh?QUOTE]

    LOL. Actually I am hibituated to Pk, so I usually take 6 steps to cover the 45 feet [not in straight line] from my room to the hall. Less steps = easier and also faster.
    For me, I just walk slowly normally, because I'm not in a hurry.

    But, if I have to rush somewhere, I just run, I can change direction fast and have quick feet despite being 6'2" 180lbs. when I have to turn, I just cut, if I have to go around it, either I jump over or I just pull a spin move like I do to defenders

    I just run in as direct a route as possible lol

    It might sound crazy, but for stairs, my habit is to skip 2, down stairs is quick feet ten jump down about halfway, at home sometimes I pull some agility training moves (Ike shuffle, in/outs type of stuff) and cut sharply for fun though

    P.S. I don't do parkour or freerunning, so I dunno any tricks and can't do a backflip and stuff lol. The best I can do is dive roll for TDs and tries lol but my favorite is to scissor kick or superman as high as possible, but if there are defenders and its a goal line stand, I just charge Fosbury Flop over them (not at their full height though obivously )
    Last edited by Shogun; 12-16-11 at 02:41 PM.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by aaqucnaona View Post
    Again, just a toy. if you want accuracy count your carotid, its easy to find and should be strong so you shouldn't miss beats. Even a medical grade pulse ox isn't necessarily accurate. Its good that it shows the trace but do you know enough to read the wave form and work out when its not working?

    I have something like this on my phone and it works the same way (finger over the camera), if your finger moves slightly it screws up and gives weird readings, certainly wont replace 2 fingers over the carotid

  19. #19
    This sentence is a lie aaqucnaona's Avatar
    Posts
    1,644
    Quote Originally Posted by Shogun View Post
    stairs
    I move about stairs by using the rails as bars to swing from and So 1 jump is all it takes to cover a flight of stairs. I havent tried more than 11 steps in a jump yet though. To climb up, I use the rails again, for partial pull up like movements so I can climb 3 steps at a time and really quick too. In fact this method is so fast I descended and climbed back up 3 stories in just under 25 seconds. It is quite tiring though. Its one of those activities I do in my pk training and 3 reps of this climb decend is enough to get my pulse near 190. Which is why I made this thread in the first place.
    Ps. I am quite ashamed to admit I still cant do a decent roll without scraping/ hurting my shoulders or hips. I have trained for 8-9 feet drops [not jumps] without roll, so I kinda lost the initaitive to roll at all. I have it scheduled next session + kong.
    PPS. I am still a novice at pk. I can do about 9 feet wallclimb, a somewhat lousy wallrun, kong, lazy and turn vaults, and a lousy roll. Btw, I have begun my training with this, if ur interested:
    http://thepiratebay.org/torrent/6574924/
    Last edited by aaqucnaona; 12-16-11 at 11:41 PM.

  20. #20
    This sentence is a lie aaqucnaona's Avatar
    Posts
    1,644
    Quote Originally Posted by Asguard View Post
    2 fingers over the carotid
    Alright, pulse count along neck for 15 seconds, got it.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •