View Full Version : Largest organic compouds


Chatha
03-01-07, 06:18 PM
What is the largest organic compound with the most carbon and hydrogen atoms. Its most likely going to be a fat but I don't know.

Absane
03-01-07, 09:12 PM
What do you mean by "largest?" Molecular weight? Size? Number of atoms?

And why may it be a fat? Perhaps a carbohydrate?

leopold
03-01-07, 09:42 PM
buckfullerine is supposedly very large

Chatha
03-01-07, 10:17 PM
What do you mean by "largest?" Molecular weight? Size? Number of atoms?

And why may it be a fat? Perhaps a carbohydrate? fats have longer chains than oil. Fats are the largest organic compounds. The size is usually determined by the number of carbon atoms.


buckfullerine is supposedly very largeWhats the molecular formular?

leopold
03-01-07, 10:22 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fullerene

leopold
03-01-07, 10:27 PM
a molecule with 540 carbon atoms:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/35/C540_stereo_animation.gif

Chatha
03-01-07, 10:28 PM
Is male enhancement really possibly through drugs? There is a pill called extenze, its supposed to make you..(coughs)..large. Whats the deal with this med. How does this gimick work? www.extenze.com

pilpaX
03-02-07, 07:54 AM
Dna?

Positron
03-02-07, 08:41 AM
Well yes it could be a fat but fats and I believe carbohydrates are in a group called lipids so I think it's definetly a lipid of some kind. All lipids usually have twice as many hydrogens as carbons plus 1 and have a group on the top depending on what type of lipid that usaully contains a few oxygens or nitrogen. But remember it doesnt necessarily have to be a lipid as Hydrogen and oxygen are pretty light. I would look at some sugar compounds as well.

Nasor
03-02-07, 09:52 AM
Simple organic polymers can be huge. They are basically never-ending carbon chains.

Sarkus
03-02-07, 10:35 AM
There are some proteins with some bizarre sizes, especially ENAPTIN...

C44189 H71252 N12428 O14007 S321



There's also a protein called TITIN (sometimes CONNECTIN) that is even bigger:

C132983 H211861 N36149 O40883 S693

and the official long chemical name is 189,819 letters long!!

Apparently its to do with striated muscle formation.

draqon
03-02-07, 10:40 AM
buckyballs are large...they are carbon molecules shaped as a ball.

http://www.rochester.edu/news/show.php?id=568

Facial
03-02-07, 06:03 PM
Proteins. No limit on how large they get. But then if we take most organic polymers, you can see...
Cellulose? Keratin? Spiderwebs? Chitin? Polyethylene?

If we exclude polymerized organic compounds (which can be very large) and other polymers then proteins imo would be the largest class of organic compound.

Absane
03-02-07, 09:24 PM
Proteins. No limit on how large they get.

Can't carbohydrates be bounded by nothing?

przyk
03-03-07, 05:03 AM
buckyballs are large...they are carbon molecules shaped as a ball.
Diamonds are larger.

Nasor
03-05-07, 12:36 PM
If we exclude polymerized organic compounds (which can be very large) and other polymers then proteins imo would be the largest class of organic compound.
It could be argued that proteins are just polymerized amino acids.

Positron
03-07-07, 09:24 AM
I think that a protein would be the largest Organic molecule.

draqon
03-07-07, 09:29 AM
I think that a protein would be the largest Organic molecule.

which one?

and what is the largest inorganic molecule than?

Sarkus
03-08-07, 04:06 AM
which one?Well, as said above:

There's also a protein called TITIN (sometimes CONNECTIN)


C132983 H211861 N36149 O40883 S693

i.e. it has 132,983 Carbon atoms, 211,861 Hydrogen, 36,149 Nitrogen, 40,883 Oxygen and a mere 693 Sulphur atoms.

It's large.

And the official long chemical name is 189,819 letters long!!

Apparently its to do with striated muscle formation.

Facial
03-08-07, 08:14 PM
It could be argued that proteins are just polymerized amino acids.

In some cases. In others, you start to get a three-dimensional (ternary and above) conformations in the layers, made possible by disulfide bonds.

In this sense it's a little similar to vulcanized rubber, but we see that as you extend the size, the functionality of a certain protein changes into various forms (the gazillions of enzymes) or gets destroyed, or you can build it to a certain size and stop such that the protein itself becomes a monomer (as in spiderwebs or keratin). In essence there's a limit for functionality on a protein on certain size conditions, but the limit to which monoblock proteins can be built that define a unique purpose is probably limitless.

Contrast this with synthetic polymers, which have more or less linear profiles and predictable properties in the bulk form. Sugars like glycogen and starch behave likewise. Lipids likewise.

Or in short, proteins are "exciting" while other polymers are "boring."

Hercules Rockefeller
03-12-07, 05:31 AM
Only one person has answered correctly. DNA is by far the largest organic polymer in existence. Nothing else comes close. Let’s take human chromosome 1 (the largest human chromosome but not the largest chromosome in nature) as an example:

A chromosome is comprised of one continuous double stranded molecule of DNA. The two stands are held together by hydrogen bonding, so each single strand is its own distinct molecule.

Chromosome 1 has 247,249,719 bases (each strand).


Purines (adenine and guanine) have 5 carbon atoms.



Pyrimidines (cytosine and thymine) have 4 carbon atoms.



Ribose has 5 carbon atoms.



Phosphate has no carbons (PO4-)


So, let’s use the average of the number of carbons found in purines and pyrimidines for each position in the DNA strand:
4.5 carbon atoms.

Each position on the strand is comprised of a base (either purine or pyrimidine), a ribose and a phosphate. These three items together are called a “nucleotide”.

Total carbons for each nucleotide (base + ribose + phosphate) is:
4.5 + 5 + 0 = 9.5 carbons.

Multiply this by the number of nucleotides in chromosome 1........

9.5 x 247,249,719 = 2,348,872,330 carbons!!!!

My quick calculation of the complete formula for the DNA molecule in chr1 is:

C2348872330H2719746909N741749157O1483498314P247249 719

This may be a little off as I have taken averages for the composition of the four nitrogenous bases, but it will be pretty close.

Positron
03-14-07, 08:49 AM
Well I would agree DNA is the largest organic molecule but that's something most people know already. I'm still curious as to the Second largest though.

Facial
03-14-07, 01:29 PM
DNA is a coded polymer, meaning that it would have monotonous digital properties.

Just about every other polymer, outside RNA, would carry no information and have a single monotonous analog property.

A protein is very large, and in general they have non-monotonous, or unique, analog properties.

It really depends on what functional properties you want to look at.
If it's all-out biggest, then I would probably say a protein polymer, such as spider silk (I don't know the actual one).