View Full Version : Does gold react with oxygen,water,air?


Gravage
03-15-05, 06:45 AM
Pure gold is the most non-reactive of all the metals in compund with oxygen,air,wet,water and oceans,it is the most ductile and the most malleable metal.
My question,despite I searched thru the entire net,but everywhere I went says that gold,IN NATURE,doesn't react with oxygen,water,salt water in seas and oceans and etc... it says that gold cannot react with oxygen,water,air,salt water in seas and oceans-but only pure gold can't.
Since it say on every website I've been on,that pure gold has the lowest reactivity-level,does it mean it can react with oxygen,water,salt water in seas and oceans,and all kind of acids,does it mean gold is completely immune to oxygen,water,air,salt water in seas and oceans,and completely immune to even the strongest acids,or there is some degree gold oxygenates-let's suppose that pure gold reacts with oxygen,water,salt water in seas and oceans,and all kind of acids just about 0.0000000001%but it still reacts with these NATURAL environmental conditions.or pure gold doesn react with these elements mentioned above at all,not even 0.0000000001%-which means gold is completely immune to these conditions mentioned above(oxygen,water,air,salt water in seas and oceans)?
Thanks!

Odin'Izm
03-15-05, 01:28 PM
If you heat gold it becomes more reactive, and gold does oxidise but very slowly , and does react with acid but also slowly, gold is not the most unreactive substance, the elements in the 8th columb the "nobel gases"

The same was siad about dimonds in the 60's untill someone decided to super heat a dimond and drop it into liquid oxygen... due to the temperature gradient the dimond evaporated into CO2.

Gravage
03-16-05, 03:39 AM
If you heat gold it becomes more reactive, and gold does oxidise but very slowly , and does react with acid but also slowly, gold is not the most unreactive substance, the elements in the 8th columb the "nobel gases"

The same was siad about dimonds in the 60's untill someone decided to super heat a dimond and drop it into liquid oxygen... due to the temperature gradient the dimond evaporated into CO2.

So,even pure gold oxidizes on heightened temperature?
OK,but does the same PURE GOLD oxidize in normal temperatues like in nature,from -90 to +100 C in nature,and if pure gold,in normal and room temperatures does oxydize,why is in nature gold found in its metallic form,can salt water from the sea and oceans,and air and moisture oxydize PURE gold(since PURE gold is the most non-reactive metal)?
How do you know,why I haven't found these informations on the net-about that even pure gold can oxydize?
Thanks again!

Silas
03-16-05, 05:48 AM
Gold is not immune to all kinds of acids. A mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid will dissolve gold. It is for this reason that such a mixture was called aqua regia.

Gravage
03-16-05, 05:57 AM
Gold is not immune to all kinds of acids. A mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid will dissolve gold. It is for this reason that such a mixture was called aqua regia.

Read the questions above,again.I asked if pure gold is immune to ordinary water,oxygen,salt water in seas and oceans in NATURAL ENVIRONMENT,and why gold is in nature in his metallic form,and not in an oxide?

neil cox
03-16-05, 06:11 AM
In recent years we have learned to measure parts per billion, even parts per trillion.This has given zero, none, non-reactive ect a new meaning, so such words rarely applies to anything correctly. We annoy even our colleagues if we try too hard to speak correctly, such as using the superlative case only with lots of qualifiers and disclaimers. On a square meter of gold surface, my guess is, an atom of gold reacts with something at intervals of seconds, but it takes thousands of years for the surface to appear slightly tarnished and billions of years to destroy the surface in average non-corrosive conditions. Some of these gold compounds are rather unstable, so they tend to revert back to gold over the longterm. Neil

Gravage
03-16-05, 06:17 AM
In recent years we have learned to measure parts per billion, even parts per trillion.This has given zero, none, non-reactive ect a new meaning, so such words rarely applies to anything correctly. We annoy even our colleagues if we try too hard to speak correctly, such as using the superlative case only with lots of qualifiers and disclaimers. On a square meter of gold surface, my guess is, an atom of gold reacts with something at intervals of seconds, but it takes thousands of years for the surface to appear slightly tarnished and billions of years to destroy the surface in average non-corrosive conditions. Some of these gold compounds are rather unstable, so they tend to revert back to gold over the longterm. Neil

Thanks,Neil!
Actually,I found an website that gold oxygenates,but in lower percentage than all other noble metals?
If so why I couldn't find this information on the net,and how do you know all that?
You're probably a chemist,right?

Silas
03-16-05, 06:30 AM
I did read the questions, one of them read as follows:
does it mean gold is completely immune to oxygen,water,air,salt water in seas and oceans,and completely immune to even the strongest acids,I was simply informing you that it is not immune to "even the strongest acids", and incidentally posting a bit of trivia that might be of interest to other people than yourself.

Odin'Izm
03-16-05, 03:37 PM
Thanks,Neil!
Actually,I found an website that gold oxygenates,but in lower percentage than all other noble metals?
If so why I couldn't find this information on the net,and how do you know all that?
You're probably a chemist,right?

Has to be... same attitude towards knowledge as any chemist I have ever met... that or just someone too big for his own boots...

nice post though neil I agree... but gold reacts faster than 1 atom per few seconds i would think...

Gravage
03-18-05, 04:10 AM
Has to be... same attitude towards knowledge as any chemist I have ever met... that or just someone too big for his own boots...

nice post though neil I agree... but gold reacts faster than an atom per few seconds.

Hey,Odin and Neil,let's suppose you have only one cubic centimeter of gold,how much and how fast it will tarnish,and how much time it will take to tarnish the entire surface of the pure gold in a volume of one cubic centimeter?
Odin,how do you think surface of an cubic meter and cubic centimeter will tarnish,and how long it will take for the entire surface to get tarnished?
Also,does a mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid exist in natural environment(I'm asking this since a mixture of hydrochloric and sulphuric acid dissolve gold!)?
Thanks,again!

Gravage
03-18-05, 04:20 AM
Has to be... same attitude towards knowledge as any chemist I have ever met... that or just someone too big for his own boots...

nice post though neil I agree... but gold reacts faster than an atom per few seconds.

Also,Neil and Odin do water and air affect gold,like oxygen in natural environment and in normal temperatures?
Thanks,again!

Odin'Izm
03-18-05, 11:32 AM
Hey,Odin and Neil,let's suppose you have only one cubic centimeter of gold,how much and how fast it will tarnish,and how much time it will take to tarnish the entire surface of the pure gold in a volume of one cubic centimeter?
Odin,how do you think surface of an cubic meter and cubic centimeter will tarnish,and how long it will take for the entire surface to get tarnished?
Also,does a mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid exist in natural environment(I'm asking this since a mixture of hydrochloric and sulphuric acid dissolve gold!)?
Thanks,again!

No a mixture of the two do not exist in a natural environment.. although sulfuric acid does exist at extremely high concentrations in some volcanic lakes, as sulphur from the volcano below reacts in the water forming all sorts of things.
there are several lakes in peru at high altitudes where if you stick your hand in the water the skin will come out badly burned in several seconds.

A cubic centimetre of pure gold would take hundreds maybe thousands of years to become even slightly tarnished at room temperature... gold is practically inert unless heated or placed in a high concentration of acid.