View Full Version : What is the coldest wind chill ever recorded?


pluto2
03-31-09, 02:05 PM
What is the coldest wind chill ever recorded in the world?

cosmictraveler
03-31-09, 03:14 PM
What is the coldest wind chill ever recorded in the world?


The moment my Ex wife betrayed me, I never felt so cold before.

Enmos
03-31-09, 03:49 PM
The moment my Ex wife betrayed me, I never felt so cold before.

How can your ex-wife betray you :confused:

pluto2
03-31-09, 05:07 PM
Please guys, I want a real answer. :bugeye:

Baron Max
03-31-09, 05:56 PM
What is the coldest wind chill ever recorded in the world?

Don't know for sure, but my best guess is on the top of Mount Everest in the middle of a major storm.

But why can't you type "coldest wind chill" in google? Bet you'd get gazillions of sites/answers.

Baron Max

Enmos
03-31-09, 06:29 PM
Please guys, I want a real answer. :bugeye:

Apparently, they don't keep wind chill records. But the lowest reliably measured temperature on Earth of −89.2 C (−128.6 F) was in Vostok on 21 July 1983.
Now all you have to do is find out what the wind speed was on that day and calculate the wind chill. It's very like that wind chill would be close to the max ever 'measured' in my opinion.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chill#New_wind_chill_index

cosmictraveler
03-31-09, 08:43 PM
How can your ex-wife betray you :confused:

She set me up then stole everything I owned!

Diode-Man
03-31-09, 10:10 PM
Please guys, I want a real answer. :bugeye:

I'd imagine that the coldest windchill would be on Pluto, but that is now considered a meager planetoid.


Apparently, they don't keep wind chill records. But the lowest reliably measured temperature on Earth of −89.2 C (−128.6 F) was in Vostok on 21 July 1983.


Do you think windchill is even a factor on Pluto?

When things get that cold its literally beyond human comprehension.

Enmos
04-01-09, 03:12 AM
Do you think windchill is even a factor on Pluto?

When things get that cold its literally beyond human comprehension.

Dude, I do believe you need an atmosphere to have wind chill..
Besides, I really think we're talking about Earth temperatures.

Enmos
04-01-09, 03:13 AM
She set me up then stole everything I owned!

Ah ok.. but she was your ex-wife already then.
It's kind of pointless to say that your nemesis betrayed you, no ? ;)

cosmictraveler
04-01-09, 06:57 AM
Ah ok.. but she was your ex-wife already then.
It's kind of pointless to say that your nemesis betrayed you, no ? ;)

She set me up while we were still married. She was seeing another man without me knowing about it then set me up to put me away long enough to steal everything away from me that was in both our names, cars, trucks, bank accounts, property, tools, equipment etc. etc. .

shorty_37
04-01-09, 07:02 AM
I wouldn't be surprised if it was somewhere in Canada. It is normal to get windchill's in the -25 to -40 range.

Syzygys
04-01-09, 07:08 AM
80% of the questions asked on this website can be answered faster and more accurately by using google:

-184 to -192 F in Vostok July 3 2004

For North Dakota:

In 1985 there was a wind chill of -103 degrees F.

Syzygys
04-01-09, 07:12 AM
To complicate the issue, apparently there are/were 2 ways to measure winchill:

"Historic Wind Chill Temperatures in Minnesota

What is the coldest windchill ever seen in the Twin Cities or Minnesota? The answer can be a little tricky because on November 2001 the formula on how to calculate the windchill was changed. Perhaps the coldest windchill the Twin Cities has ever seen was -67 degrees F with the new formula (-87 degrees F with the old formula) back on January 22nd 1936. The temperature was -34 degrees F with a wind speed of 20mph. All traffic in the Twin Cities was severely hampered and a number of fatalities were caused by the cold. Without a lengthy state-wide wind record, it is difficult to say when was the coldest statewide windchill. There are some candidate dates though besides January 22, 1936. On January 9th and 10th, 1982 temperatures of -30 degrees F and winds of around 40mph were reported in Northern Minnesota. This would translate to -71 degrees F by the new formula (-100 degrees F by the old formula.)"

shorty_37
04-01-09, 07:13 AM
80% of the questions asked on this website can be answered faster and more accurately by using google:



Yup that is what I do unless I am looking for a more opinion based answer.

I do wish Orleander would start using it.

chris4355
04-01-09, 09:13 PM
She set me up while we were still married. She was seeing another man without me knowing about it then set me up to put me away long enough to steal everything away from me that was in both our names, cars, trucks, bank accounts, property, tools, equipment etc. etc. .

Do you still date other women after that? I think if someone I loved and married did that to me I would lose all hope for relationships.

Orleander
04-02-09, 10:40 AM
Do you still date other women after that? I think if someone I loved and married did that to me I would lose all hope for relationships.

and that's what happened. :(

milkweed
04-02-09, 03:07 PM
Doesnt matter once you get past -20 (windchill or air temp). Just doesnt matter once it hurts to breath. Its just tooth cracking cold then.

Thoreau
04-02-09, 04:37 PM
I was in Milwaukee a few years ago and it was -33 with windchill at 7AM. It was so cold that the tires to our car literally froze to the asphalt. NOT FUN.

I remember going out to smoke, bundled up, and could barely get two puffs of my cigarette before I chose to go back inside.

Geez, the extremes I've been in. It was 148*F my first day in Iraq during my first deployment. If I had to go back and to them both again, I would definately choose the heat.

Orleander
04-02-09, 08:54 PM
....If I had to go back and to them both again, I would definately choose the heat.

I'm the opposite. I can always put more clothes on. Wit the heat, I can only get so naked.

I hate when the inside of your nose freezes.

milkweed
04-02-09, 09:05 PM
I was in Milwaukee a few years ago and it was -33 with windchill at 7AM. It was so cold that the tires to our car literally froze to the asphalt. NOT FUN.

I remember going out to smoke, bundled up, and could barely get two puffs of my cigarette before I chose to go back inside.

Geez, the extremes I've been in. It was 148*F my first day in Iraq during my first deployment. If I had to go back and to them both again, I would definately choose the heat.

Yeah, thats cold.

Worst one I went through was 93 hours of below zero temps in 1996. Duluth MN went 186 hours below zero that same year. This year we had 86 hours below zero. Nothing like a tv weather guy announcing "the high today is expected to reach -2". -24 (air temp) when I left for work one morning that week and the temp dropped to -26 before it began to rise again. With cold like that, you create your own windchill just walking. Its kinda weird how sound carries in the extreme cold, you can hear mice under the snow and other animals walking around in the woods. Trees pop like a gun has been shot, getting big cracks in them. The cracks usually heal up leaving a slight scar.

Every person should experience -20 air temp at least once in their life.

nietzschefan
04-02-09, 09:30 PM
Yeah, thats cold.

Worst one I went through was 93 hours of below zero temps in 1996. Duluth MN went 186 hours below zero that same year. This year we had 86 hours below zero. Nothing like a tv weather guy announcing "the high today is expected to reach -2". -24 (air temp) when I left for work one morning that week and the temp dropped to -26 before it began to rise again. With cold like that, you create your own windchill just walking. Its kinda weird how sound carries in the extreme cold, you can hear mice under the snow and other animals walking around in the woods. Trees pop like a gun has been shot, getting big cracks in them. The cracks usually heal up leaving a slight scar.

Every person should experience -20 air temp at least once in their life.

I've slept outside in -40(doesn't matter what system you use at -40) and it really DOESN'T matter what the fuck the wind chill is. I forget the exact temp, but all water vapor becomes solid at some point and it's a moot point because any exposed skin, or body area to the elements...is fucked. So wind chill doesn't matter.

Every person should experience -20, for a month. You should see how nice Edmontonians are to each other in January, it's actually kinda freaky. I have a theory on this being a reason far northern counties are often peaceful....well at least in modern times. It's a realization that the planet really doesn't give a fuck if you live or die...so you are kinda in "it" together with everyone else. Man/Woman/child(yes I DID WALK IN A FOOT OF SNOW FOR A MILE AT -20 TO SCHOOL) VS Nature, cold and uncaring.

Buffalo Roam
04-02-09, 11:16 PM
I've slept outside in -40(doesn't matter what system you use at -40) and it really DOESN'T matter what the fuck the wind chill is. I forget the exact temp, but all water vapor becomes solid at some point and it's a moot point because any exposed skin, or body area to the elements...is fucked. So wind chill doesn't matter.

Every person should experience -20, for a month. You should see how nice Edmontonians are to each other in January, it's actually kinda freaky. I have a theory on this being a reason far northern counties are often peaceful....well at least in modern times. It's a realization that the planet really doesn't give a fuck if you live or die...so you are kinda in "it" together with everyone else. Man/Woman/child(yes I DID WALK IN A FOOT OF SNOW FOR A MILE AT -20 TO SCHOOL) VS Nature, cold and uncaring.

I have slept out at those temperatures and saw a tree explode from the freezing temperature, it split in half, it was just after sunrise.

Built a snow shelter in a drift bank against a hill, and it actually wasn't that bad inside the shelter,me and the three other guys on the survival course actually had the temperature inside up to +30 in our snow cave.

I remember walking to school at 20 below in the 60tys, and that was a mile, to school and a mile back, we had to cross a bridge over the Wisconsin River, and that was the coldest 90 feet of the whole walk, over that river.

milkweed
04-03-09, 08:25 AM
I've slept outside in -40(doesn't matter what system you use at -40) and it really DOESN'T matter what the fuck the wind chill is. I forget the exact temp, but all water vapor becomes solid at some point and it's a moot point because any exposed skin, or body area to the elements...is fucked. So wind chill doesn't matter.

Every person should experience -20, for a month. You should see how nice Edmontonians are to each other in January, it's actually kinda freaky. I have a theory on this being a reason far northern counties are often peaceful....well at least in modern times. It's a realization that the planet really doesn't give a fuck if you live or die...so you are kinda in "it" together with everyone else. Man/Woman/child(yes I DID WALK IN A FOOT OF SNOW FOR A MILE AT -20 TO SCHOOL) VS Nature, cold and uncaring.

Like I said, once you hit -20 (windchill or air temp) it doesnt matter any more.

And you dont need to experience it for a month. One day/night is enough. After that its just punishment.

milkweed
04-03-09, 08:29 AM
Built a snow shelter in a drift bank against a hill, and it actually wasn't that bad inside the shelter,me and the three other guys on the survival course actually had the temperature inside up to +30 in our snow cave.


You PAID people to teach you that? Wow. We grew up building our own to play in.

Buffalo Roam
04-03-09, 02:55 PM
You PAID people to teach you that? Wow. We grew up building our own to play in.

No I got paid to do that stuff, it was called Arctic Survival Training, and was part of my education under Uncle Sam's tutelage.

milkweed
04-03-09, 04:07 PM
No I got paid to do that stuff, it was called Arctic Survival Training, and was part of my education under Uncle Sam's tutelage.
Ah Ha!

I didnt think you would pay someone for that. Read a book about it Sure. Uncle Sam training course makes even more sense.

nietzschefan
04-03-09, 07:06 PM
Mine was Arctic survival training also (but really in the Arctic, I assume Buff was in Alaska, I was in the NW Territories) .

You had to survive 3 weeks, on a week's worth of rations. Had to somehow find extra food(mostly rabbits), build a shelter out of parachutes, etc. In -40 or worse.

Then I went home in Edmonton for -20 to -30C weather and it was balmy.

Yeah a day of -20 is fuck all.

Buffalo Roam
04-03-09, 08:32 PM
Mine was Arctic survival training also (but really in the Arctic, I assume Buff was in Alaska, I was in the NW Territories) .

You had to survive 3 weeks, on a week's worth of rations. Had to somehow find extra food(mostly rabbits), build a shelter out of parachutes, etc. In -40 or worse.

Then I went home in Edmonton for -20 to -30C weather and it was balmy.

Yeah a day of -20 is fuck all.

Yep out of Fort Wainwright, Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska January-February, never even saw the sun, dam was I glad to get back to Ft. Hood Texas.

They were bitching because it had gone below 32f, 0c for the months of January and February.

I laughed my ass off, dam that was that funny.

Xylene
04-04-09, 12:56 AM
I heard that in Stalingrad, German soldiers were dying when they went to relieve themselves outside because the cold was so intense.

nietzschefan
04-04-09, 01:04 AM
I heard that in Stalingrad, German soldiers were dying when they went to relieve themselves outside because the cold was so intense.

Bad Head gear and even worse- bad foot gear. Their jack boots drained heat so fast out of their bodies, the troops that did not freeze found interesting ways to keep their feet warm.

Improvising head gear is easy, well maybe not easy to be able to fight in - foot gear is really hard to improvise.

Ophiolite
04-04-09, 02:34 AM
It was pretty damn cold the day I forgot our wedding anniversary.

ThinkingMansCrumpet
04-04-09, 06:37 AM
It was 148*F my first day in Iraq during my first deployment.

That's impressive! The day you arrived and it beat the old 'hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth' by a full twenty degrees F.

Buffalo Roam
04-05-09, 10:03 PM
Bad Head gear and even worse- bad foot gear. Their jack boots drained heat so fast out of their bodies, the troops that did not freeze found interesting ways to keep their feet warm.

Improvising head gear is easy, well maybe not easy to be able to fight in - foot gear is really hard to improvise.


I have a picture of a German Soldier standing Guard in Russia wearing a set of boots made from rushes, woven into boots, stuffed with grass, according to the story they were purchased from the local Russian and made excellent winter foot wear, keeping the feet warm and dry.

The Lapp's used a similar idea, leather winter moccasins stuffed with grasses.

Thoreau
04-06-09, 11:25 AM
That's impressive! The day you arrived and it beat the old 'hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth' by a full twenty degrees F.

Excuse me while I actually pull up the picture of the thermostat from that day. Might be a few hours before I can get to it since I'm at work and have better things to do at the current moment.

ThinkingMansCrumpet
04-07-09, 01:08 AM
Excuse me while I actually pull up the picture of the thermostat from that day. Might be a few hours before I can get to it since I'm at work and have better things to do at the current moment.

Yes, well, being the highly educated bright spark that you are, you'll realise before you do post it that if it's not in the shade it doesn't count.

Oh shit, it was in the sun wasn't it.
Good thing you know how to kill!...Oh Shite!..*can of worms*

Ophiolite
04-07-09, 05:07 AM
I am always suspicious of individuals who would rather believe their own observations than the evidence. :)

Thoreau
04-07-09, 11:36 AM
Yes, well, being the highly educated bright spark that you are, you'll realise before you do post it that if it's not in the shade it doesn't count.

Oh shit, it was in the sun wasn't it.
Good thing you know how to kill!...Oh Shite!..*can of worms*

Lay off of the insults, pal. You, being a new guy (or gal) around here, should be wise enough to at least learn something about the people before blindly insulting them.

And no, I was not aware that it had to be in shade. If you are standing in direct sunlight, is that not the temperature that you are feeling? In other words, if the thermostat (in direct sunlight) states 148*F, is it not the same when you are standing in it as well?

Xylene
04-14-09, 12:32 AM
Still on subject...sort of;) During their Winter War against Russian troops in 1940-1General Mannerheim issued his Finnish troops with boots that were one size too large so they could wear two pairs of socks.

Regarding the wind chill record, I'd say any reading from Mount Washington, which is notoriously windy, and literally deadly cold in Winter.

Ophiolite
04-14-09, 12:41 AM
Lay off of the insults, pal. You, being a new guy (or gal) around here, should be wise enough to at least learn something about the people before blindly insulting them.I'm not new and my post was not a blind insult, just an insult.


And no, I was not aware that it had to be in shade. If you are standing in direct sunlight, is that not the temperature that you are feeling? In other words, if the thermostat (in direct sunlight) states 148*F, is it not the same when you are standing in it as well?
The temperature that is important is air temperature. This is the temperature that is reported in meteorological and climatological studies and reports.

Objects in direct sunlight will absorb heat, whether they are rocks, trees, lizards, or thermometers (not thermostats). Their temperature can rise significantly above that of the air temperature (most of the heating of the air is indirect heating from the ground, not from the passage of sunlight through the air).

So a thermometer exposed to the direct rays of the sun will absorb heat from the sun and radiate a portion of that heat to the surrounding air until an equilibrium is established. That equilibrium will be at a much higher temperature than the shade temperature. The shade temperature is the only one which has signficance (unless you are a lizard trying to run across hot desert sand).

Thoreau
04-14-09, 10:38 AM
I'm not new and my post was not a blind insult, just an insult.


The temperature that is important is air temperature. This is the temperature that is reported in meteorological and climatological studies and reports.

Objects in direct sunlight will absorb heat, whether they are rocks, trees, lizards, or thermometers (not thermostats). Their temperature can rise significantly above that of the air temperature (most of the heating of the air is indirect heating from the ground, not from the passage of sunlight through the air).

So a thermometer exposed to the direct rays of the sun will absorb heat from the sun and radiate a portion of that heat to the surrounding air until an equilibrium is established. That equilibrium will be at a much higher temperature than the shade temperature. The shade temperature is the only one which has signficance (unless you are a lizard trying to run across hot desert sand).

I wasn't talking to you which is why I quoted someone else. :p And thank you for the information.

Ophiolite
04-15-09, 12:42 AM
I know you weren't talking to me, but my mild insult was directed against you.

I'm glad you found the information useful.

macie21
04-15-09, 01:50 AM
Don't know for sure, :shrug: but maybe it's 184 to -192 F in Vostok July 3 2004.

What is Wind Chill? :bugeye:

Wind chill is the apparent temperature felt on exposed skin due to wind. The degree of this phenomenon depends on both air temperature and wind speed. The wind chill temperature (often popularly called the wind chill factor) is always lower than the air temperature for values where the wind chill formula is valid. In cases where the apparent temperature is higher than the air temperature, the heat index is used instead.