View Full Version : The ten most important events in the 20th century?


Undecided
01-30-04, 02:59 PM
This my list of the ten most important events in the last century:


World War One
Russian revolution
Great Depression
World War Two
Decolonization
Soviet atomic blast
Creation of Israel
Iranian revolution
Chinese Revolution
Globalization


You?

static76
01-30-04, 03:14 PM
1) Invention of atomic weapons - Forever changed the way World power is distributed throughout the planet.

2) WW2 - Change the US from an isolationist nation to the "World's policeman", for good and bad.

3) Invention of the computer - Allowed the rate of technological advancement to increase at an unprecidented rate.

4) Invention of the airplane - Huge impact on World economics, travel, warfare, and exploration.

5) Woman's Suffarage

6) Cold War

7) Invention of Television

8) WW1

9) Space race (US/USSR)

10a) Creation of Israel

10b) Internet

10c) US Assasinations of the 60's(MLK, JFK, RFK)

Undecided
01-30-04, 03:18 PM
10a) Creation of Israel

10b) Internet

10c) US Assasinations of the 60's(MLK, JFK, RFK)

Let's be fair, pick one please.

static76
01-30-04, 03:22 PM
10a) Creation of Israel

10b) Internet

10c) US Assasinations of the 60's(MLK, JFK, RFK)

Let's be fair, pick one please.

:p It's hard to just pick one...

OK, I guess the invention of the internet will have the most profound effect for the future so that's my choice.

fireguy_31
01-30-04, 05:29 PM
Undecided

I'm curious, where did "de-colonization" occur during the 20th century? And how was it actuated?

spuriousmonkey
01-31-04, 07:51 AM
11. discovery of penicillin
12. development of the pill.

Pollux V
01-31-04, 09:11 AM
I can't decide, because...well, all the important events come down to World War 1. That war changed everything. It laid the foundation for the world that we live in today. It had a heavy hand in creating the USSR and giving the US the power it has now. Everything goes back to World War 1.

Also the placement of George W. Bush at the top of the nation seems to have had a substantial effect around the world. But then again, he wouldn't be there if World War 1 had never happened.

Spyke
01-31-04, 01:16 PM
Also the placement of George W. Bush at the top of the nation seems to have had a substantial effect around the world. But then again, he wouldn't be there if World War 1 had never happened.

Why wouldn't he be president if WW1 had never happened?

Ozymandias
01-31-04, 01:20 PM
'Also the placement of George W. Bush at the top of the nation seems to have had a substantial effect around the world. But then again, he wouldn't be there if World War 1 had never happened.'

/Yeah...electing morons to positions of political power does have its consequences.

Undecided
01-31-04, 01:49 PM
I'm curious, where did "de-colonization" occur during the 20th century? And how was it actuated?

Well the major wave of de-colonization began in 1947 with the independence of India, and it lasted into 1980 with the total independence of Zimbabwe. Decolonization of the third world make Europe into a largely irrelevant speck in comparison to the two antagonists the US and the USSR playing their imperialist games in these new independent states. The decolonization was important because it gave the world freedom from European oppression, but it also signaled a era of increased warfare, increased poverty, and general un-ease worldwide.

Also the placement of George W. Bush at the top of the nation seems to have had a substantial effect around the world.

Sadly that was in the year 2001...

Pollux V
01-31-04, 04:04 PM
I don't think he would be president because I also believe that, had the two largest wars in recent memory not occured the nation's history would have turned out very differently. FDR would have had only two terms, Truman probably would have never been President.

Neurocomp2003
01-31-04, 10:55 PM
medicine
Vaccinations(health care)
neural imaging techniques
protective sex.
computer/math
invention of the Computer
invention of the internet
mobile phone
physics
space race
space station/satellites
atomic weapons
society
women's suffarage (is a good one static76)

Undecided
01-31-04, 11:15 PM
Neurocomp2003

You posted 15, and these are not 20th century phenomenon:

i)medicine- the Greeks have that one
ii) Vaccinations(health care)- both were in existence prior to the 20th century.
iii)protective sex.- again existent before the 20th century.
iv)math- not even going to go there.
v) physics- does Sir Isaac Newton ring a bell?
vi)society- yes....?

Ozymandias
01-31-04, 11:40 PM
Yeah, Neurocomp, I think you have to realize that there was a period in time before this last century. And yes, that period of time DID have society...

:m:

spuriousmonkey
02-01-04, 05:41 AM
i)medicine- the Greeks have that one
Obviously he meant modern medicine. And he is quite right in that. One could also think about modern hygiene. Yes the romans had hygiene too. Such as sharing a sponse to wipe their arses after shitting.


ii) Vaccinations(health care)- both were in existence prior to the 20th century.
not until last century is was common to die of many viral and other infections. Only last century we had a systematic approach to this problem.

figure out your own problem with the rest of them.

Undecided
02-01-04, 12:31 PM
Obviously he meant modern medicine.

Then he could have written that no?

not until last century is was common to die of many viral and other infections. Only last century we had a systematic approach to this problem.


But this does not mean that it existed only in the 20th century...

spuriousmonkey
02-02-04, 03:03 AM
But this does not mean that it existed only in the 20th century...

Mortality rates of the past seem to indicate the opposite.

cosmictraveler
02-02-04, 11:11 AM
1. Telephones

2. Computers

3. Advancements in health care

4. Advancements in Physics and math

5. Advancements in Chemistry

6. Advancements in aircraft and space exploration

7. Television

8. Environmental planning

9. Movies

10. Advancements in human waste disposal both garbage and excrement.

Neurocomp2003
02-02-04, 12:36 PM
sorry i forgot that this text editor doesn't save the way you type
4 of those are subtitles
medicine,
comp/math
physics
society
and the things that arre below them are what i considered
which are the 4/6 you listed
lol you think i'd state math and physics as achievements of only the 20century(well physics has excelled beyond believe in the 20th century)

and yes i did mean modern medicine,allowing us to do what we want,eg. eat,extreme sports and get into accidents and mend us back together

vaccinations? really like child annoculations?
protective sex in what form?

Undecided
02-02-04, 02:51 PM
spuriousmonkey

Were vaccinations 20th century inventions? No...end of story.

lol you think i'd state math and physics as achievements of only the 20century

So this thing doesn't happen again, use your tags.

vaccinations? really like child annoculations?

I am not sure of which vaccinations for sure it was, but I know they were in existence in the 1800's, some disease I think some sort of pox, or flu?

protective sex in what form?

They used animal skins; I know the Ancient Egyptians used wood...ow!

Neurocomp2003
02-02-04, 03:56 PM
either comparing what we had then and what we have now...gives our society more leeway to do things.

Undecided
02-02-04, 04:55 PM
Yes, but the premise of this thread was for things that were made, or major events in the 20th century.

Neurocomp2003
02-02-04, 11:12 PM
well ok then was health care back then?

Undecided
02-03-04, 08:12 AM
In which sense? If you mean doctors helping the poopulation, yes. Was it good medicine? No, but nevertheless, it did exist.

Neurocomp2003
02-03-04, 10:28 AM
stuff like OHIP...health care coverage.

Undecided
02-03-04, 11:50 AM
You live in Ontario? Universal Healtcare you mean? Well I am not sure if it is a 20th century innovation. You should find out...

spuriousmonkey
02-03-04, 11:59 AM
spuriousmonkey

Were vaccinations 20th century inventions? No...end of story.



Thank you for your open mind in this matter.

Undecided
02-03-04, 12:08 PM
spuriousmonkey

Why are you acting as if this is something that is we can have a opinionated debate, The fact is that the vaccinations are not unique to the 20th century. Do you deny this? I don't need a "open mind", if I were to use my fantasy then I would agree with you, but since reality dictates...

spuriousmonkey
02-03-04, 12:16 PM
not until last century is was common to die of many viral and other infections. Only last century we had a systematic approach to this problem.

remember this?

Undecided
02-03-04, 12:22 PM
That is not indictating anything but mass inoculations, it does not say anything about the vaccine being a purely 20th century deal. If you said the Small Pox vaccine I would accept it because it altered mankind, and it was in the 20th century. But to claim the vaccince as being 20th century deal is misrepresentation of the facts. This is not my opinion, it's merely a fact.

spuriousmonkey
02-03-04, 12:26 PM
That is not indictating anything but mass inoculations, it does not say anything about the vaccine being a purely 20th century deal. If you said the Small Pox vaccine I would accept it because it altered mankind, and it was in the 20th century. But to claim the vaccince as being 20th century deal is misrepresentation of the facts. This is not my opinion, it's merely a fact.

Good for you that you have facts. History doesn't work like that.

Undecided
02-03-04, 03:00 PM
So then tell me, wtf are you even trying to say? You aren't making any sense.

Redrover
02-03-04, 10:04 PM
I would of though somebody would have given this one already:

Man landing on the moon.

spuriousmonkey
02-04-04, 04:04 AM
So then tell me, wtf are you even trying to say? You aren't making any sense.

It is not worth my effort if you don't understand by now.

BigBlueHead
02-04-04, 08:57 AM
I think the invention of the sixties was one of the most important events in the twentieth century. Of course, it took them until 1983 to invent them...

Undecided
02-04-04, 02:54 PM
It is not worth my effort if you don't understand by now.

Loving the cognitive surrender pal, what you were calling was mass inoculations and you know it. What you were telling me before was vaccinations themselves, so insist on the surrender I will insist on laughing.

The 60's

Was a interesting time to say the least, it seemed to have the nexus of a relatively peaceful social revolution. By the looks of it the US by the 1960's was a state that had some key events take place. I think the election of Kennedy being a catholic symbolized change, and renewal of the US, the WASP monopoly had been broken in the US. Racial movements found their voice in leaders like MLK, and Malcolm X, with progressive leaders who interpreted the constitution and the bill of rights as they should be read, for all men. The era is known as the "American enlightenment" with aspects of individuality, exercising that freedom, a huge middle class, a society which was deeply idealistic, and a society that was trying to really reform what is the US. The movement of youth in that period of history brought fresh new ideas. The 60's also had its bad side; hedonistic values overrode the people of the US, the spread and influence of drugs, and sex. The period of the 60's was obviously a movement against war, especially in Vietnam. The period was one of a gradual Soviet-US detente after the atomic testing treaty, and stability in the USSR under Brezhnev. It reached the fever pitch at the convention in Chicago 1968, and the election of Nixon in the same year. The 60's really ended in the early 70's after the spirit of the 60's burned out in 1972, and the American enlightenment ended around the rise of Disco.

BigBlueHead
02-04-04, 03:08 PM
And of course this is how MTV remembers the sixties today. Or no, actually that part of history has been totally revised in the popular consciousness to be entirely unlike the events you just mentioned.

Martin Luther King is a soundbite
Kennedy is a sack of meat in the back of a car
Nixon is a library
Vietnam is a series of movies
Drugs were invented in the sixties

No one remembers. Talk to a high school student... they probably don't remember Reagan. The reinvention of the sixties is an important event in the twentieth century, even if it happened a little late.

Undecided
02-04-04, 03:14 PM
I can tell you that ppl don't care about the past, it is the perfect example of willed ignorance. The 60ís were a time of real change; I think the verdict is still out on whether or not it was a good thing or bad thing for the US. I mean obviously the Black movement, and Feminism has made the US better, but has the rest? Have things gone too far? Is America really the America that your founding fathers wanted?

Redrover
02-04-04, 06:55 PM
Why should America (or Canada or Great-Britain or anything else, for that matter) be what our founding fathers wanted? Shouldn't it be what we want?

Undecided
02-04-04, 07:37 PM
Why should America (or Canada or Great-Britain or anything else, for that matter) be what our founding fathers wanted? Shouldn't it be what we want?

My answer is no, because if we use that logic constitutions and the like mean nothing. The cornerstone of our societies is the respect of enlightenment ideals, and egalitarianism, and Utilitarianism as the foundations of our societies. But to have the period of time control itself would be like a teen without a parent, it would go wild. For instance it may be popular to kill x ppl for no reason, but it is populist and thus we are getting what we want. That is obviously not right, if society did what it wanted it is possible blacks would still be segregated today. We as a society need a guide, and to ignore the founding fathers of nations would be to ignore the nation itself.

otheadp
04-13-04, 08:04 PM
in no particular order

* atom bomb (as someone said, it changed the distribution of power)
* numerous healthcare advances (prolonged life expectancy considerably, boom in world population)
* WWI, WWII (it taught europe to behave, and caused it to turn towards prosperity)
* 1973 oil embargo (the west's inflated ego was popped like bubble gum. it was reminded how vulnerable it really was)
* fall of USSR, and the end of the cold war (people stopped worrying about nuclear armageddon... at least for a short while)
* the development of Ford's mass production techniques (made cars affordable to everyone. owning a car became a normal thing for everyone, not just the stinken rich. the introduction of cars into American Life (and therefore Western life))
* decolonialization (created nationalist 3rd-world gov'ts all over the world, angry and bitter with their former colonizers)
* internet (e-commerce, online dating, new culture and ways to communicate, etc.)
* pearl harbour (the US changed its isolationist policy and from now took a more active role in influencing foreign governments - to put it mildly)
* the Balfour Declaration (which called for the creation of Israel, in 1917)

Blazin_billy
04-13-04, 10:25 PM
In order of most important:
1. Development of Aircraft+space exploration
2. World War II
3. World War I
4. Sufferage Movement
5. Modern Medicine
6. Rise and fall of Communism
7. Computers
8. New deseases (AIDS, super-bacteria)
9. USA's superpower
10. MTV


that last one is a joke!

kingtiger123
02-01-09, 01:47 AM
world war two is the most important event of the 20th century hands down. the amount of progress that we went through over the second world war is amazing.

Tyler
02-01-09, 11:20 AM
Three points:

(1) Considering the size and former importance of China, the revolution (1949) is not the most important Chinese event of the 20th century. Had Maoist systems been allowed to continue, China would be unbelievably less integral to the world economy than it is today and will be for the next however many decades or longer. The most important Chinese event of the 20th century was the gradual (though amazingly quick in retrospect) change towards Capitalism, internationalism and baby steps towards a modern sense of rights and law. In a centuries time, Deng XiaoPing and the class of the '80s will be regarded as the men who perhaps most shaped the future. Maybe the most amazing part is that Deng seemed to understand this at the time, and had very high expectations for China's future.

(2) For those considering Russia; though the Revolution and Fall are two extremely huge events, you might want to consider the death of Stalin. Like with Maoism, Stalinism extended past his death would have meant a grossly different world. The detente with Russia started the minute Stalin died.

Tyler
02-01-09, 11:21 AM
And MTV may be a joke, but TV should be on the list. Television has changed all over lives and had a much larger impact on the 20th century than the internet.

leopold
02-02-09, 03:40 AM
in no particular order:
1. polio vaccine.
2. invention of the transistor.
3. atomic bombing of hiroshima.
4. moon landing.
5. dec. 7, 1941 (pearl harbor)
6. first nonrefueled nonstop circumnavigation of the earth by air.
7. woodstock.
8. first commercial electronic computers.
9. voyager probes.
10 conquest of everest.

Orleander
02-02-09, 11:47 AM
#1 on my list would be invention of the birth control pill

superstring01
02-02-09, 10:56 PM
#1 My Birthday. Everything else will be but a small memory in comparison, one day.

~String

Nasor
02-03-09, 01:38 PM
I suspect that in 500 or 1000 years people will look on things like the development of quantum theory, relativity, the internet, etc. as much more important than any particular war or revolution that occurred in the last century.

If you asked some guy in 3000 B.C. what the most important event of the last century was, he would probably tell you about some kingdom conquering some other kingdom. But if you asked a historian today, they would probably say the most important thing was people figuring out how to make bronze.

Pandaemoni
02-06-09, 03:59 AM
I suspect that in 500 or 1000 years people will look on things like the development of quantum theory, relativity, the internet, etc. as much more important than any particular war or revolution that occurred in the last century.



It comes down to how we are defining "importance", which seems likely to require a good dose of subjectivity. My difficulty with posting my own list is that I can't even decide how to measure it. Technologically, you get one set of answers, politically a very different set, and the two don't cross-compare well. Can I really say that the invention of the transistor was slightly more important than the destruction of the Ottoman Empire at the end of WWI? (There was a time when affluent parents sent their kids to learn Ottoman Turkish, as early 20th century eggheads thought it would be a major diplomatic and economic necessity that people know it....much as they say about Chinese today).

I can't possibly accurately guess at what the world would be like today if a single Muslim empire had occupied land from southeastern Europe down to Saudi Arabia (and half of Iraq) through the 20th century, or if the transistor hadn't been invented. That makes the two hard to weigh against one another.

draqon
02-06-09, 04:14 AM
10a) Creation of Israel


lol

please tell me that was sarcasm...

draqon
02-06-09, 04:19 AM
1. Computer
2. Nuclear power
3. Space expansion begins
4. World War II
5. stem cell research begins
6. nanotechnology birth
7. Communism ideology challenges/success/demise
8. Internet, mass globalization share of information
9. Einstein discovery
10. Women/Black movement, race/sex revolution

sittiponder
05-21-12, 03:33 PM
RADIO - 1920's
also from the 20's
Prohibition
Prohibition Amended
"New woman" [The Flapper (clothing), smoking, the pill (free love)]
Jazz

1980's Olympic Hockey - America (Thought to be noobs) beats the Soviets [Supposedly Hockey's #1 (lol)]

...Sundays @ 7:00 AM - Japanese Kamakaze assaults, coming to a harbor near you! :runaway:

The invention of Rock And Roll (Elvis = Jazz, rock, and bluegrass, appealing to blacks and whites alike)

Speaking of blacks and whites... ("Can't we all just get along?")
BROWN vs. BOARD OF EDUCATION (regarding "separate but equal.")
Pretty much the entire civil rights movement
MLK assassination (previously stated)
(intergration and equality)
Malcom X asassination (suspected by Nation of Islam, which he left)
(black supremacy)

Other assassinations previously stated
John F Kennedy (assassin unknown?)
Robert Kennedy (assassin - Sirhan Sirhan)

Berlin wall :wallbang: - U.S. Containment policy
- "candy bombers" <nice guys who threw candy at isolated children from airplanes

The Crash
The Depression
The New Deal

And because I'm turning 17 tomorrow, I might as well throw in the invention of hip hop in the Bronx of New York, which spread out to be a world wide culture.


This is EXCLUSIVELY from the memory of a high school student.
NO notes, NO research. Just what I learned from my teacher. :itold:

My apologies if I gave false Information... I'm Human too.

hope this helped

Buddha12
05-21-12, 03:51 PM
1. Humanity didn't blow itself up with its own weapons of mass destruction.

2. Education was brought to more people around the world.

3. Medical research was pushed to new heights with untold new advances in the health and welfare field.

4. The destruction of the environment through pollution and other environmental disasters that beset humanity which humanity caused upon itself.

5. The achievement of understanding about the universe and what life started with through scientific research and space exploration.

6. The untold amout of human lives that were destroyed by wars everywhere around the world and the terrible things that those wars created.

7. Fewer people with more wealth.

8. Less honesty and more bullshit.

9. More greed.

10. I was born.:rolleyes:;)

joepistole
05-21-12, 03:57 PM
Trying to reduce a century to 10 points is no easy task, but below is my stab at it recognizing that each of the events below incorporate a great number of events.

1) World Wars I and II
2) Creation of the United Nations (unprecidented international cooperation on world issues)
3) Invention of Nuclear Technology
4) Invention of the Transistor
5) Keynesian Economics
6) Banking Reform and Regulation(creation of Federal Reserve, Glass-Steagall, etc.)
7) The Marshall Plan
8) Near Universal Education in the Industrial World
9) Communism, the Rise and Fall
10) Proliferation of Computer, Communication and Transporation Technologies