View Full Version : The relation of hair whorls to brain development


maxg
09-15-07, 03:49 PM
My wife & I took our daughter Sarah to see a geneticist and neurologist a few months back (she has a delay in motor skills but not speech or cognitive abilities, if that's relevant) and the geneticist noticed that Sarah has a double hair whorl (i.e., her hair grows out of her head in two circular patterns as opposed to the usual one--also one pattern goes clockwise and the other counter-clockwise).

The geneticist suggested that this was associated with higher rates of developmental delays, but from what I've read that seems to be far from accepted and in fact there are some people who suggest that this pattern is associated with gifted children.

What does appear to be more widely accepted is that this pattern is associated with handedness and that with this particular pattern my daughter has a 50% chance of being left-handed (much higher than the general population).

I'm curious what the reason might be for associating hair patterns with handedness or cognitive development and whether any of you who know more about genetics might have more information on the subject.

Orleander
09-15-07, 04:03 PM
Hmm, that's very interesting. When we had to take our daughter to a pediatric neurologist, he asked if she had a birth mark. ??

I never realized there was supposed to be a correlation between these things. Are they hair whorls or cow licks?

maxg
09-15-07, 08:09 PM
Hair whorls. Most people have a single hair whorl on the back of the head. She has 2 with the hair pattern on each going in opposite directions.

Huwy
09-15-07, 08:17 PM
like a "crown"?
i think my dad has 3

maxg
09-15-07, 09:12 PM
Yes--same as a crown--3 is very rare.

Medicine*Woman
09-15-07, 09:54 PM
My wife & I took our daughter Sarah to see a geneticist and neurologist a few months back (she has a delay in motor skills but not speech or cognitive abilities, if that's relevant) and the geneticist noticed that Sarah has a double hair whorl (i.e., her hair grows out of her head in two circular patterns as opposed to the usual one--also one pattern goes clockwise and the other counter-clockwise).

The geneticist suggested that this was associated with higher rates of developmental delays, but from what I've read that seems to be far from accepted and in fact there are some people who suggest that this pattern is associated with gifted children.

What does appear to be more widely accepted is that this pattern is associated with handedness and that with this particular pattern my daughter has a 50% chance of being left-handed (much higher than the general population).

I'm curious what the reason might be for associating hair patterns with handedness or cognitive development and whether any of you who know more about genetics might have more information on the subject.
*************
M*W: I congratulate you and your wife on your keen interest in your child's hair whorl. Most people don't know this, but a child's hair whorl tells us a lot. I've seen babies with 2 cm. hair whorls, two hair whorls, uneven hair whorls, and such. It is true that hair whorls tell us a lot about brain development. My mother had two hair whorls and so did I (if that tells you anything). When I was a small child of about four, when I entered the first grade (yes, the first grade), my mother told my teacher that I was "backward." I continued to hear that, and again, my mother told my teacher when I was in the sixth grade that I was "backward!" Than god my teacher rebutted and said that, "no I was not backward!" It was that teacher, long into my elementary education, that gave me hope that I might, just might, be normal! I know that my mother was never pleased with me, nor could I please her... but there was no way in hell that I was backward. It's so sad that parents have the power to set the stage for their children. It's no wonder that I was depressed in childhood. I had a jealous mother. She's gone now, but for whatever reasons, my mother hated me. But, life goes on, and I have always loved and accepted my own children and grandchildren who are the lights of my life.

Back to hair whorls... sometimes they can determine mental illness. Sometimes they can identify brain damage. Sometimes they can pinpoint lesions in the brain. Most people don't understand that the hair whorl on their heads can lead to an enormous amount of diagnoses on gross examination. And, OTOH, when we see a perfectly formed hair whorl on a newborn, we know that they are probably physically and mentally okay.

I really appreciate you bringing up this topic. It is truly timely and informative. It's those little things that we overlook for the most part that can tell us so much!

Thank you!

Medicine*Woman
09-15-07, 09:56 PM
like a "crown"? i think my dad has 3
*************
M*W: Tell us more about your dad. I'd like to know about his life.

Zephyr
09-16-07, 04:09 AM
Now that is interesting. I always thought that handedness was genetic, but:


The dominant allele dictates right-handedness—and a clockwise hair spiral. So having even a single copy yields a right-handed (or dexter) bias, as is the case for most people. Having only the recessive version, rather than causing left-handedness (or, as Klar would say, "non-right-handedness," to include the ambidextrous), does not direct any preference at all and results in a 50:50 mix of righties and nonrighties. In addition to generating southpaws half the time, two copies of the so-called "random-recessive" allele lead to a (separate) 50:50 chance of having their heads spin counterclockwise.

So somebody can appear right handed, but if they don't have the right handed allele, they are just as likely as a left hander to have left handed children.

http://www.americanscientist.org/template/AssetDetail/assetid/29757?&print=yes
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466530_5

Orleander
09-17-07, 10:20 AM
I just want to shave my head now and see what I have. If you have long hair, how can you tell?

maxg
09-17-07, 10:50 AM
I just want to shave my head now and see what I have. If you have long hair, how can you tell?

Ask your barber/hairdresser, they seem to be aware of the phenomena since it can make hair styling more difficult. Otherwise ask someone to look at your head, even with long hair it should be coming out from the head in a particular pattern--they may need to push down a little to see it.

palbrown
09-20-07, 10:50 PM
Maxg--We have a 20 month old son with a double hair whorl that goes in opposite directions. He has been a late walker (due to mild hypotonia) and talker (his cognitive skills seem to be as good as they could be based on his low expressive language skills). We have put this kid thru extensive genetic testing--650 band chromosome count, fragilex. etc. along with a slew of metabolic testing. Its all came back as negative for any syndromes or diagnoses. The neurologist, developmental pediatrician, and geneticist have all sort of "brushed off" my concern about the double hair whorl. I actually brought it to their attention as I started to really look at my kid with a fine tooth comb for anything "dysmorphic" about him. This was all that I or any of the experts could find that seemed dysmorphic. I have been told there might be a connection to being ambidext. Both my husband and I are right handed and have another son who is a left hander and is very bright (spoke in full clear 4 word sentences by 18 months, has a great memory for details, but is no athlete at age 3.5). My brother was a lefty too, but no double hair whorl.

I have also been told that 6-8% of the general population has a double hair whorl. My hairdresser says that she sees a few clients each week with a double. It still bugs me though.
PAL

spuriousmonkey
09-21-07, 02:14 AM
oh goody. A sticky pseudoscience thread in a science forum.

one_raven
09-21-07, 04:55 AM
oh goody. A sticky pseudoscience thread in a science forum.

Pseudoscience?

If THIS isn't proof positive...

My mother had two hair whorls and so did I (if that tells you anything).
...then I don't know what is.

spuriousmonkey
09-21-07, 06:32 AM
my apologies. My judgment was once again too fast. I'm very happy that facts are guiding this thread.

maxg
09-21-07, 09:17 AM
oh goody. A sticky pseudoscience thread in a science forum.

While it hasn't been studied much, I'm not sure what's pseudoscientific about the question? It does appear that hair whorls are related to handedness and there is a genetic predisposition for handedness. So while it may be speculative to consider other associations it doesn't seem like we're talking about phrenology here.

If the other links weren't convincing here's some abstracts from the medical literature:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=17558812&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=15940700&ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=15169958&ordinalpos=10&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

spuriousmonkey
09-21-07, 09:47 AM
Regarding the articles you cited, phrenology woud then be just as relevant.

iceaura
09-21-07, 10:37 AM
Not just pseudoscience, for better or worse - example: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04102006-145843/unrestricted/jenkinse_etd2006.pdf

But if you read the thing, which I don't really recommend, somwhere in there is an interesting little one sentence observation about the meta analysis; that most of the correlations - between features like hair whorls and such things as schizophrenia - disappear when the person cataloguing the features is ignorant of the diagnosis of the disorder.

maxg
09-21-07, 10:49 AM
Regarding the articles you cited, phrenology woud then be just as relevant.

Care to explain further?

spuriousmonkey
09-21-07, 10:52 AM
Care to explain further?

No, other than to mention the words 'cause and effect' and 'shared developmental pathways' and 'combinatorial control'


and maybe

'fluffy'

whitewolf
09-21-07, 02:53 PM
I was waiting for this for so long. I shivered and bit my nails, stuttering, "No, it CAN'T be, it MUSTN'T be...." And finally, I saw it:


oh goody. A sticky pseudoscience thread in a science forum.

palbrown
09-21-07, 07:29 PM
Hello--
I am only concerned about trying to help my son with the appropriate therapies for his delays. I am not sure how old your daughter is. My son is 21 months this week and still not walking or talking. He is in all kinds of therapies. The PT can't get him walking on his own. Have you had any luck addressing your daughter's motor delays with therapy? I hope she is making grreat progress.
PAL

maxg
09-21-07, 09:29 PM
Hello--
I am only concerned about trying to help my son with the appropriate therapies for his delays. I am not sure how old your daughter is. My son is 21 months this week and still not walking or talking. He is in all kinds of therapies. The PT can't get him walking on his own. Have you had any luck addressing your daughter's motor delays with therapy? I hope she is making grreat progress.
PAL

Sarah is 19 months old. She talks some (about 10 words, mostly starting with "b") but her receptive language skills are better than her expressive.

I think (and her therapists agree) that a lot of her problems are related to lack of muscle control (her muscles will go from extremely rigid to extremely flacid without much in between). For instance with language, it sounds like she's trying to put words together but can't always form the sounds. She also has lazy eyes, still isn't standing on her own or walking, can't sit on her own for long, etc. She has made progress though. While she can only crawl a few inches at a time, she has figured out how to move across the floor using pivoting and rolling. None of the tests (MRI, genetic testing, etc.) have shown any recognized problem other than signs of a "developmental delay," which we already knew.

Her therapists (2 for PT and 2 for occupational therapy) consider her smart and she's also very social with both other kids and adults and is a remarkably happy baby who very rarely cries but laughs quite often. I guess at this point we just need to wait and see how she develops. My wife didn't walk until she was 2 and her grandfather (who had what was diagnosed in those days--circa 1900--as Ricketts) took even longer. In our case, it was actually the geneticist who drew attention to the double hair whorl but I don't know what, if any, significance it has (obviously some people here think none).

I hope your son is doing well otherwise.

S.A.M.
09-21-07, 09:30 PM
Hmm not worth a discussion on validity, then?

I ran it through pubmed and thought it would be interesting.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Link&db=PubMed&dbFrom=PubMed&from_uid=14504234

palbrown
09-21-07, 10:26 PM
MaxG--
Sounds like we both have socially happy, laughing kiddos that struggle with muscle issues. I believe my husband and I can relate to taking our child to neurologists, geneticists, developmental peds, and oh yes, all the therapists. Andrew's only diagnosis has been benign congenital hypotonia. Some question if this really is a diagnosis or just a "holding pen" for a diagnosis. Andrew has been cruising and crawling since 13 months and recently has taken to getting onto coffee tables, adult chairs, and at 20 months, up a child-sized slide the wrong way. This has been his main strength. We keep hearing that he will walk when his trunk muscles are strong enough to compensate for his low tone. He can walk with one hand support, but not on his own. He was stood a few times when he did not realize he was standing, but does not seek out to stand. We also hear that he might have motor planning problems (apraxia) that could be contributing to his motor related delays, including speech (we only hear mama, dada, bahl (ball), gamma (grandma), dat (for what we think is "that"--perhaps we are hearing things), moo, and random mostly vowels sounds). He seems to understand one-step directions and can point to requested items (ie. where is your hair?). We are currently battling the worst double middle ear infection he has had. I don't believe this is any way connected to the double crown :). He is still a trooper, even breaking some smiles thru it all.

Oh yeah--in terms of the double hair whorl, I don't really seem to care which hand he eventually decides to write with at this point. The goal is to get him scribbling with a crayon! Off to get some sleep before another day of antibiotics and ear drops.

Thank you again for sharing Sarah's story. Looks like we both have kids that keep us on our toes. I wish Sarah much continued progress.
PAL

Konosuke
03-11-10, 11:26 AM
Actually having 2 or multiple hair whorls is not a concrete evidence on it's own.
I have done Qi test and got an average above 160 , a range for genius.
You should do check on your child and check his handedness at young age. Most of the case people with multiple hair whorls are left-handed. If such is the case like I, check that you child have LLRTM1 gene- a gene associated with intelligence. Actually left handed person have more chance to have this gene.

Normally left handed people with multiple hair whorls are highly gifted as genius..developing photographic memory, high graded intuitive memory and well structured long term memory, quick thinking and learning capabilities..
they should have reversed brain hemispheres with the left-side larger than the right side.. as to what my doctor said on my kinds

Gifted persons tend to develop multiple abilities and become polivalent. They tend to develop an inbound affinity for creativity and logistic effortlessly..
learning art and music easily , logistic course like programming and thourough thinking are most ideal for us.


on the drawback:
dyslexia, schysophrenia, brain cancer and other mental diseases, n possible viral disease bent more risk towards us...I'm myself affected by UNIS due to hook position we lefties tend to adopt while writing..I do suffer a lot while writing yet my brain works alot..I hate taking note for that reason and thus as used to prefer memorizing them ..People say that I can think quick..

Also be warned..people with 2 whorls might necessarily be genius , they can also develop mental delays and other traumic disease like autism..

One good advice is to cater for such kid..wish my parents had knew earlier I were a gifted one

John99
03-11-10, 11:33 AM
"Normally left handed people with multiple hair whorls are highly gifted as genius"

woo hoo. thank you, i only recently noticed that i, myself, have multiple whorls. AND i am left handed too, AND my grandma used to slap my hand with a ruler to get me to stop writing with my left hand but there was no way i was gong to stop writing with my left hand. NEVER.

kittypink
03-11-10, 04:28 PM
hi there, i have just been searching the net to find out meanings regarding hair crowns/whorls , my dd (5) has 3 or 4 crowns in her hair, she has one crown right at the front of her hair......i am slightly psychic and always feel she was supposed to be a twin( no idea why) but i wondered if the crown was realted to that .i have 3 children and she is by far the brightest, she has always spoke early, and really clearly (better than me-she's almost posh), where as my other (single crowned) children were much more delayed....she could write perfectly with both left and right hands up until about age 3 and a half, she now favors her right hand.......the only prob i have with her (not sure if its just a girl thing) she is very emotional, she worries about getting into trouble at school (worries silly) when she is a really good girl...she cries alot when she doesnt get her own way ...very stubborn.......:shrug:

Giambattista
03-11-10, 05:44 PM
You're slightly psychic? I have questions...

EmilyUnderhill
10-28-10, 06:24 PM
I have three crowns on my head.
I have ALOT of hair !!!
one on the left back going anti clockwise,
one on the right back going clockwise,
and one in the centre back also going anti clockwise.

I find all of this quite interesting, and never knew that there was relevance with the Crowns to brain development.

I am an artistic person, who is really not very good at maths or science. Its almost like my brain just cant function, and make sence of it. Is this linked at all ?

I also find that I'm an emotional person, and i get upset quite easily.

Emily x

Spud Emperor
10-28-10, 08:32 PM
I also find that I'm an emotional person, and i get upset quite easily.



Quick leave now.

I do like a chance to rediscover an old thread where the posters actually had
more than 3 brain cells to rub together.

I also have three whorls. I am a nutcase and I do keep my whorls apart.

purplerosee
12-17-10, 12:32 AM
To read positive feedback about people with multiple crown that they are associated with genius and intelligence make me less worry now.

I have a 3 months old son and he have multiple hair whorl, double on the middle of his head, 1 on the middle of his forehead and 1 on the left of his head below his ear. A total of 4. He didn't have that much hair and the swirl is good looking. He appear to be developing normally like any babies and he like to baby talk a lot. My only concern is his temper. His father is a hot tempered person.

chelsea285
01-26-11, 06:22 AM
Hey guys.,
Im 15 yrs old,
And i have a double crown.
Only found out a couple of weeks ago,
It interesting what you say about intelligence.
Im right handed.
I am actually quite intelligent.
I was a gifted and talented student from k-6
I can play music by ear, Maths to me, is like counting sheep.
I have very good hand-eye co-ordination from what ive been told
Started my apprenticeship in hairdressing when i was 14 which is a very young age to be a hairdresser.
Umm theres really nothing else that i can think of.
But im very talented, i can do alot of stuff with computers.
But im like satans daughter
Everyone thinks im evil.
Hmm an evil genious, sounds good. haha

Cifo
01-26-11, 10:16 AM
Autism Dysmorphology Measure (ADM) Training Manual, Page 9 (http://depts.washington.edu/dbpeds/Dysmorphology%20Training%20Manual%201-10-08%20(2).pdf)

Hair Growth Patterns — Significance & embryology
Scalp hair distribution provides important clues to early development. The hair bulb forms at 14 weeks and the growth of the scalp, which is strongly influenced by brain growth, stretches the hair shaft from its original perpendicular orientation to more vertical, so the hair “lies down” and doesn’t “stand on end”. Brain growth doesn’t exert a uniform pull on the skin and the most rapidly growing area, between 16 to 19 weeks, is capped by the posterior hair whorl. Generally it is off center and back at around the position of the posterior fontanel. The third influence is the suppression of hair growth in a circle around the face, around the ears and less distinctly along the back of the neck. Finally, the posterior hair line is influenced by growth of the neck or neck edema. This is commonly observed in Turner syndrome where prenatal swelling of the neck occurs due to dysplasia of the lymphatics which usually recovers by the end of gestation. The result is a wide neck, a low posterior hair line and upsweep of the hair line. Examination technique:
Look at the child from the front, the back and from above, noting the hair lines, hair whorls and cowlicks.

Abnormalities
a. The position of the posterior hair whorl is not exact, but multiple hair whorls, widely spaced (>3cm) double hair whorls, markedly displaced hair whorls or no posterior hair whorl are abnormal.
b. A frontal cowlick is an accessory hair whorl and though relatively common it indicates a subtle alteration in fetal brain growth. A marked upsweep, especially in conjunction with other hair growth pattern abnormalities is abnormal.
c. A low anterior hairline especially approaching the lateral eyebrows is abnormal.
d. A widow’s peak is seen in patients with hypertelorism and reflects a lack of hair suppression around the eyes as they are laterally displaced. A marked widow’s peak is abnormal.
e. Upsweeps of the posterior hair line or slightly low posterior hair lines are common and if not pronounced are considered normal variants.

Normal variants
a. A central hair whorl which occurs in 5% is a normal variant.
b. A mild frontal upsweep which occurs in 15% of people is a normal variant.


So, it's the brain's growth that stretches the scalp which can affect/produce hair whorls. I have also read that in utero exposure to alcohol can cause various facial and head abnormalities, including the hirsuitism and whorl abnormalities.

dbnp48
01-26-11, 11:30 AM
I did a few minutes of research but wasn't able to find anything credible that linked double crowns to intelligence or handedness.

joepistole
01-26-11, 11:38 AM
I believe these are commonly called cowlicks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowlick

And I am not aware of any brain pathology associated with them.

Cifo
01-27-11, 03:54 PM
I tried to find what I had read years ago in some Bureau of Indian Affairs literature, and I found this:

Unusual hair whorl patterns may occur in babies with central nervous system malformations
http://newyorkhealth.gov/nysdoh/dpprd/justification.pdf

Saquist
01-27-11, 04:35 PM
It sounds like the counter clockwise whorls that were attributed to being homosexual.

amir
04-12-11, 02:48 PM
my 2 year old son has 4 whorls and seems to be normal but i would like to know the significance of it.

Me-Ki-Gal
04-12-11, 03:20 PM
My wife & I took our daughter Sarah to see a geneticist and neurologist a few months back (she has a delay in motor skills but not speech or cognitive abilities, if that's relevant) and the geneticist noticed that Sarah has a double hair whorl (i.e., her hair grows out of her head in two circular patterns as opposed to the usual one--also one pattern goes clockwise and the other counter-clockwise).

The geneticist suggested that this was associated with higher rates of developmental delays, but from what I've read that seems to be far from accepted and in fact there are some people who suggest that this pattern is associated with gifted children.

What does appear to be more widely accepted is that this pattern is associated with handedness and that with this particular pattern my daughter has a 50% chance of being left-handed (much higher than the general population).

I'm curious what the reason might be for associating hair patterns with handedness or cognitive development and whether any of you who know more about genetics might have more information on the subject.

I don't know , but something you said made Me think there was a relationship of characteristics that insinuated that cause Me to believe Gifted might be it . I have had several gifted children in my life and one thing is for sure " when they are young" they ain't that coordinated. They can develop coordination in there own way and excel beyond normal capabilities, but they have a tendency to think in a different manner than Non Gifted Children . On thing I might add on a personal level is to let them be social with other kids close there own age. It has been my experience if they form bonds with there peers they will lift the other kids interest in life in general . Every one benefits in a community is my personal take and I believe if a community promotes gifted programs as much as ( I won't say it ) the community as a whole benefits. Gifted Kids can be lost in society and go down paths in life some dare to tread . Society loose , mainly when they slip off into states of depression and hopelessness. If you child is gifted keep a close eye on depressive states of being. They have to be challenged, or better said inspired . It is there nature . If they are not , well watch for the signs . I think from my limited knowledge of you and your child " GIFTED yeah !!!
Personal observations from a layman with lots of kids going through American school systems of churnem and burnem ..................

Me-Ki-Gal
04-12-11, 03:41 PM
Hello--
I am only concerned about trying to help my son with the appropriate therapies for his delays. I am not sure how old your daughter is. My son is 21 months this week and still not walking or talking. He is in all kinds of therapies. The PT can't get him walking on his own. Have you had any luck addressing your daughter's motor delays with therapy? I hope she is making grreat progress.
PAL
My kids couldn't get it together until late either . I didn't worry about it as I my self was a a late walker . My Daughter could not talk until she was 2 a full 24 months and maybe more . She did make gibberish noises, when she was about 2 and 1/2 She was looking at a news paper and jabbering and I realized she was reading the news paper and I could now understand her. Talk about being floored . She learned how to read from sesame street I believe . Hell I don't know one of those freaky things in nature . She had an Autistic cousin that taught him self to read at 2 though and some how I think heredity played a big roll. Weird by my standards of reality

hanfusa
05-10-11, 12:04 PM
Hi, I work with children with Autism and most of them have a double crowns. Has anyone ever noticed this before. It worries me because I have never seen so much children with double crowns having the same condition. In fact before working here I had never seen anyone with a double crown.

Grandma
05-11-11, 06:24 AM
I recently took a newborn assessment class and they were talking about the hair whorl placement. When I inquired what it meant if a child had 2 it led me to the internet and this thread. My grand daughter has 2, rotating in opposite directions. I was BLOWN away to read how many children with this are diagnosed with hypotonia. She too has mild hypotonia; spit up A LOT, sat up late, didn't walk until she was 21 months. Her speech seems to be fine, she is very happy and social. The only other fact I can contribute is prenatally her fetal monitoring tracings were NEVER very reactive. She was monitored all the time b/c her mother had low platelets. A decrease in variability is a reflection of CNS development...I'm interested to hear how your children are now, 3 and 4 years after your post.
Thank you for posting on this topic.

Ilah
08-07-11, 04:42 AM
This is all very very interesting. I was trying to look into my (8yr old)son's swirls. He has 3 in total. The normal one in the normal position swirling outwards, one more forward just a tad smaller but the 3rd one ... right at the very front of his head about 3cms from his hairline on his forehead but it swirls inward. When his hair is the right length, all the hairs cross over in the middle to form a star. Its pretty cool.
He has no learning difficulties whatsoever, infact he's rather gifted, very very very swtiched on, crazy intuition and totally loves science. He does have issues with concentration but I think he just gets bored. His brain never seems to stop ... neither does his talking lol. He's full on. His brother (5yrs old) has had fluid on the brain since birth, delayed almost everything, he can be impossible to get through to at times, his head is sooooo far away. But he has the most incredible yet random memory Ive ever come across, he can and frequently does freak people out with his memory.

So this has been very very interesting to say the least ... Thanks to all for their contribution.:)

drtom
09-21-11, 10:50 AM
I am double crowned, which is to say, I have both a clockwise and a counterclockwise whorl. One of my brothers has a similar pattern. I have two siblings who are left-handed, and my mother was trained not to use her left hand by her Central European grandparents, so I suspect she is a genetic lefty.

Five family members qualified to skip the fourth grade, although only two elected to do so. Two could read before even starting school. My uncle is an active member of Mensa. I ranked in the top one-half percent of college-bound seniors on my college entrance exams. In the eighth grade I read on a college level and scored higher than my teacher in vocabulary and read at a rate of over 800 words per minute. I do not have a number for my IQ, I was told that "it is over 145."

While it is very interesting to observe patterns between ability and hair whorls or other physical attributes, one should keep in mind that these are not 100% concordant, and that there are multiple influences on development and ability. Imagine a world where people are screened at birth for double hair whorls and relegated to institutions based on the findings of the expert screener. According to what some people have written here and the stock they have placed in such patterns, there is definitely a need to exercise caution.

Thank you.

Telemachus Rex
09-21-11, 06:46 PM
I did a few minutes of research but wasn't able to find anything credible that linked double crowns to intelligence or handedness.

I'm in the same boat. The shape of the exterior of the skull clearly has nothing to do with brain development, as the phrenologists taught us by negative example, but the placement of follicles in the dermis on the skull reveals vital clues about the brain and its development? Color me skeptical until science has done a little more work on this one (or, if I am just ignorant of all the science out there, until someone points me in its direction).

spandan
01-19-12, 09:36 PM
i have 4 hair whorls...one anticlockwise...other 3 clockwise

RichW9090
01-21-12, 10:38 PM
A quick perusal of the literature suggests, as I was sure it would, that there is absolutely no relationship between pelage patterns and brain developemnt in any animal, let alone humans.

Believing that there is such a relationship is the same as believing in Phrenology, the idea that bumps of the skull can be used to characterize the personality of the person. Popular in the late 1800s, it is rejected, and has been for 100 years, as anything other than voodoo science today.

Rich

lana22
01-29-12, 07:07 PM
This is so interesting! I have a younger brother who has a double crown and has so many similarities with those mentioned here! He didnt start talking until very late, dont know how old exactly but was definately at least 2. That appears to be his only developmental problem however he is now 5 and a total genius! At 3 he could count to over 100 (for most kids its amazing if they can count to 10 before age 5) and he could also read very early. At 4 he could write storys and read adult books and when he came across a word he hadnt seen before he sounded it out and got it right 80% of the time. His memory is incredible, when I get dressed he tells me all the places Ive worn that particular item of clothing (even from years back!) and I wouldnt even know that! My stepmum (his mother) links it all to autism, including the double crown. Im a student nurse and through my studies I am sure he does NOT have autism! He does have some unusal traits, such as an obsession with the TV and can easily get stressed when things arent perfect or straight, and tends to throw tantrums when things dont go his way, but personally I believe most kids are like this and really its down to the indivual person and parenting! Also, antisocial behaviour and inability to communicate are linked to autism but my brother is the most bubbly, friendly, kind little boy and has loads of friends so therefore autism is out. But I definately agree with those who suggest intelligence and excellent memory is linked to the double crown!! lucky lucky!! (except when it comes to hair styling, its difficult, cant grow it too long because whoa it sticks up and out in all directions!)

origin
01-29-12, 07:56 PM
I have 3 whorls, each whorl looks like the number 6. They radiate outward from a central point. This is interesting stuff - but I will have to check in later I am late for the One World Govement think tank I am leading.

crosman
04-09-12, 09:08 AM
I came across this forum by accident but have found it an interesting read. I thought I'd share our experience since my daughter (who is now 7) has had many similar experiences as some of you with younger children. My daughter also has a double hair whorl and is a leftie. We knew this as early as 2 months of age. She had right-sided hemiparesis (of unknown etiology) until she was about 3. It has decreased markedly due to intense PT, OT, etc. She also has had significant hypotonia all over except her face which was very tight as a child. All milestones were late but achieved. She was also a late talker but was just fine with receptive language and she used sign language so well that we had to stop it - she wouldn't speak while using it! Also, like others, she's showed some general motor planning problems and weakness/fatigue with her muscles. She's also prone to infections alas.

However, my daughter is at least average - likely above average - in intelligence. We've not had her tested yet but she's in a challenging private school and doing very well. Indeed, her intelligence has made a diagnosis difficult, at least from a genetics standpoint. Her memory is astonishing. She's also very musical (which I noticed from other posters) and has the ability to sight read, adapt music from one instrument to another, and writes her own compositions now. She reads easily etc.

So, for those of you who continue to bounce from doctor to doctor without diagnosis, there is hope! I've gotten to the stage where we manage her care (she still has all therapies) but it keeps her going and she's completely integrated into school. She just tires more easily than others and cannot run as fast. We also would love a diagnosis to be sure we're not missing something that will pop up later on that we could head off a bit now. Other than that, she's an amazing girl although I suspect she's going to hate those hair whorls when she's older!

Best to you all.:)

Buckaroo Banzai
04-12-12, 07:12 PM
I don't really know much of the subject, but I've read just some very superficial things (news reports/press releases) that may be related with that. Such as apparently left handed people and homosexual people (or perhaps specifically male homosexuals) tend to have something related with a different hair whirl too. Also several congenital conditions that are related with deficits or differences in cognitive abilities are related with more or less subtle patterns of differences in facial traits. Trisomy of the chromosome 21 is a common example of a more evident case, but there are other ones that are more subtle. One that is a little bit subtle is fetal alcohol syndrome, but another one that was just recently found was autism itself, which is far from obviously correlated with a pattern of physiognomical differences.

In any case, I guess that rarely this observation alone would suffice for diagnostic, it would only be some sort of "warning sign" for further observation or even medical exams.

hairdresser101
08-15-12, 11:34 AM
Not all "whorls" are considered a double crown. Some ARE, in fact, just simply cowlicks. I've never seen anyone with more than TWO crowns. Granted, it could be I just haven't *seen* it and doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I have just one crown, I can write with both my write and left hand. I prefer to write right-handed while I do most other day-to-day tasks with my left hand. I mostly registered here just to say what my first statement said and that's that not all "whorls" are considered crowns. They are simply cowlicks.

hairdresser101
08-15-12, 11:37 AM
That should say I can write with both my RIGHT and left hand.

Aqueous Id
08-15-12, 11:07 PM
I have 3 whorls, each whorl looks like the number 6.

:roflmao:

brie
09-19-12, 07:14 PM
I came across this on accident, but as I read through some of the thread I did notice a pattern.

I hope by now (after 5 years) maxg that you have gotten the answer to you're question.

I have 2 whorls (larger on the left, smaller on the right), also a couple cowlicks. They are different.
Re: the original question.

Although neither I nor any medical professional ever considered the pattern of my hair growth a problem or connected it to any of the below; everything listed is connected to each other.
Genetically I have a dominant curly gene and a dominant straight gene.
I am the only left handed person I am aware of in my family. (Most likely a recessive gene.)
As a child I had delays in speech and motor skills. I was a late walker and didn't talk until I was almost 3 years old. I had a speech impediment that I slowly grew out of. I also had difficulty learning to read and write due in part to dyslexia and was in special education classes in elementary school as a result.
I have aspergers. (On the autism spectrum.)
As an adult I have an above average IQ. (Could qualify for mensa.)
I did not see this, but the thread is long. Before I started to talk I had migraines severe enough that the there were concerns about damage to my vision and/or paralysis. I developed amblyopia (lazy eye) in my left eye that couldn't be corrected.
I am a kinesthetic learner and to this day still have difficulty with auditory processing. I am also hard of hearing in my left ear.

fie
09-28-12, 04:41 PM
:roflmao:

OHHHHHHH. Now I get it.

karthik1890
08-31-13, 10:42 AM
I am a male and I have hair swirl / cow licks from my birth nearly 12 in count. The first thing is all swirls at the top of my for head formed in 'u' shaped pattern starting from left of my forehead and goes backward and again comes to front forehead at rightside. Many problems i have faced due to such a thing that makes my look so ugly. Many use to critise me and make fun of me due to my hair even my family members too. Nowadays after meeting new peoples i haven't expressed or ressembled the hair problem. But hair does have a fine shape and length all thought i tried many products like hair gel and sprays enough i can't get rid of it but to manage my hair like others. Alast even though i manage im unable with stand my hairs for long hours leaving as combed for long time. Everyday i have to take head bath for twice a day for keeping it wet and for managable. So i prefered for bald head most of the times.
The second most thing is mental related problems. As a proverb says "face is the index of mind" as such my mental ability and development are little quite slower. Manythings i missed in my life time unreasonably since due to hair swirl and ugly style i cant go in front of the people socialy. Because people first look goes against my hair so that they make ridiculus and makes fun. I want it to be changed. I have came across many information sites about hair swirl or cowlicks as such nothing suits my problem. So some please help me for this problem. Someone kindly reffer some genetical researchers as i don't know how to proceed with such a ridiculous thing. As for Gods grace i will be thank full for you. Since i haven't shared so many problems openly that i'm facing in reality including my family.
Please someone help me as amoung the whole worlds population i can guess 0.01% aprox. of people might having this kind of genetical problems.

origin
08-31-13, 12:06 PM
Whorls are a result of the orientation of the hair folicles - you are not going to be able to change that. Here is what you should do:

1. Wear a hat.
2. Shave your head.
3. Wear a wig.
4. Better yet just realize that this is only a problem in your head, not on your head. You are making a big deal out of this. Nobody cares nearly as much about this as you do. You are wasting your time worrying about it. There are probably 20 bald guys reading about 'your problem' and wishing they could have your problem.