View Full Version : Is clicking you fingers harmful?


BloodSuckingGerbile
08-13-02, 08:12 AM
Is clicking your finger (or any other) joints harmful?

I read that the clicking sound is caused by escaping CO<sub>2</sub>, so I conclude it's not.

Or is it? :bugeye:

Firefly
08-13-02, 10:07 AM
I hate the habit, and I believe strongly that it is harmful, though I don't have a shred of proof. :p I yell at people when they do it (or forcibly stop them!) and would never do it myself.

Lesion42
08-13-02, 10:47 AM
It is harmful, as it creates an gas bubble in between your joints, stretching the tendons a little. Over time this leads to early arthritis.

BloodSuckingGerbile
08-13-02, 03:57 PM
http://216.40.241.68/cwm/cwm/eek5.gif

I've been clickin' for over 6 years now...

Looks like I'm going to get early arthritis. Yay!



http://www.gamers-forums.com/smilies/contrib/constrector/scared.gif

P.S. How early?

NenarTronian
08-13-02, 05:18 PM
I also "click" or "crack" very often - about 3x in ten minutes. Fingers, knuckles, neck, back. Harmful, disgusting, yes, but i'm addicting, i tried going cold turkey once - i started twtiching (yes, really) :D

        
08-14-02, 05:17 PM
I have to click or my joints feel stiff all day especially my lower back.

Avatar
08-15-02, 05:36 PM
when I'm warming up every day it is inevitable.
I strech and move all my body parts and then the cracking is frequently heard.

        
08-16-02, 01:46 AM
Originally posted by Avatar
when I'm warming up every day it is inevitable.
I strech and move all my body parts and then the cracking is frequently heard.

Yeah Me too , and I spoke to me Dr he said that its a very old fashioned Idea to just leave your joints stiff, and can lead to more injury if you dont stretch them.

bbcboy
08-16-02, 05:35 AM
Spoke to one of the orthopedic surgeons here at work who says that there's no evidence of joint cracking causing any lasting damage and it is indeed just the expulsion of gas build up in the joint.

Regular stretching exercises will stretch the muscle and tendon surrounding most joints to a degree where thay are more flexible.This will not stop the build up of gas but the cracking should be less frequent.

Avatar
08-16-02, 07:34 AM
We danced in graveyards, with vampires 'til dawn.
We laughed in the faces of kings, never afraid to burn

And is your place in heaven worth giving up these kisses?
bbcboy, your sig is fantastic:):)
from where does it come?

bbcboy
08-16-02, 08:07 AM
The larger sig is from a song called Little earthquakes By Tori Amos from the album of the same name.

the other is the same artist but I can't remember the name of the song If you PM me as a reminder I'll dig it out and get back to ya. It's about a dying relationship and sung from the perspective of the one who wants it to live. another line is

"And I know that I have been driven like the snow, but this is cooling faster than I can"

In fact as I write I think it may be called cooling but she mainly sings it live so I'm not too sure.

She fackin ace mate!!

Little earthquakes is the best album to start with but you, as I, may need to listen to it about six times before you get it (Her lyrics can be a little extreme)

Happy listening and now back to the plot......

%BlueSoulRobot%
08-26-02, 03:32 PM
I can only crack my knuckles if I punch something...and my hip cracks sometimes...my knees don't exactly crack, but I feel my kneecap shifiting around...I "crack" my jaws to relieve ear pressure after swimming, but that doesn't really count...*wanders off* :rolleyes: :D

Avatar
08-26-02, 03:39 PM
the cracking quite increased after 18

I think I get old:( :confused: :eek:

Thor
08-26-02, 06:02 PM
I've only recently been able to crack my knuckles. It started when I started work. Maybe it is stress related or something.

        
08-27-02, 07:37 AM
I never new that your culture had jobs Thor. Is there a high employmet rate on the Asgard home world. Or are you all in the Military trying to fight off the replicators?

Frieda
08-30-02, 08:52 AM
where does the gas come from? how does it build up?

Backslash777
07-22-06, 04:18 PM
Avatar, I am glad to see you still posting; what an asset you have become to this site.

Popping your knuckles or clicking your fingers is not as bad as you may think. The usual argument is that it causes arthritis but research shows this not to be the case. Like anything when done to excess, other types of damage may occur with such things as stretching of the surrounding ligaments and a decrease in grip strength.
The sound is produced in the joint when bubbles burst in the Synovial fluid surrounding the joint.
The gas itself is always there but dissolved in the thick clear Synovial fluid. When you pull the joint you decrease the pressure therefore reduce the amount of gas the liquid can hold. This is called cavitation and is the same thing as what causes the bends or bubbles to appear from nowhere when you open a bottle of pop; a decrease in pressure reduces the amount of gas the liquid can hold.
After a pop the gas should take half an hour to re-dissolve again so, until this happens, you will not be able to repeat the noise in that joint no matter how hard you try!

Backslash777
07-22-06, 04:19 PM
RE: http://www.sciforums.com/showthread.php?t=10108

Avatar, I am glad to see you still posting; what an asset you have become to this site.

Popping your knuckles or clicking your fingers is not as bad as you may think. The usual argument is that it causes arthritis but research shows this not to be the case. Like anything when done to excess, other types of damage may occur with such things as stretching of the surrounding ligaments and a decrease in grip strength.
The sound is produced in the joint when bubbles burst in the Synovial fluid surrounding the joint.
The gas itself is always there but dissolved in the thick clear Synovial fluid. When you pull the joint you decrease the pressure therefore reduce the amount of gas the liquid can hold. This is called cavitation and is the same thing as what causes the bends or bubbles to appear from nowhere when you open a bottle of pop; a decrease in pressure reduces the amount of gas the liquid can hold.
After a pop the gas should take half an hour to re-dissolve again so, until this happens, you will not be able to repeat the noise in that joint no matter how hard you try!

valich
07-23-06, 03:03 AM
I'm intriqued! Damage caused from clicking must also depend on how much effort you put into it and how constantly you do it. You'd probably get calluses first.

Backslash777: Profound answer. Do you also know why your foot falls asleep? When I sit on a chair while computering I sometimes put my leg under my other. When it falls asleep it's paralyzed and I can barely move - can't feel a thing for a few minutes. Any idea why doc?

Avatar
07-23-06, 05:10 AM
Falls asleep? ha! It's because the blood circulation stops. With one leg you pressed on other's blood-vessels.

I'm glad to see you, Backslash777, still operational too. :)

Backslash777
07-23-06, 06:24 AM
Valich, thank you for your kind words. In answer to your query of what is happening to your foot when you use the computer and it falls asleep, we can answer that for you. Avatar was correct with his reply but to go into greater detail, when pressure is exerted upon your leg while at the computer you are applying pressure to an arteries therefore starving you’re your tissues with fresh glucose / oxygen carrying blood. As well as compressed arteries you could also be blocking nerve pathways, reducing the signal strength to the brain.
When you reopen these pathways some nerves fire hyperactively causing something which should feel like a burning or prickling sensation referred to as pins and needles. This in turn then fires an instinctive response in mammals to shake the affected part therefore increasing blood flow and minimising damage.
Taking drugs to excess, especially sedatives such as alcohol or opiates causes organisms to remain still for excessive periods of time, especially while sleeping. This can cause a condition known as Radial Neuropathy (emergency room staff prefer to call this Saturday Night Palsy) where areas are deprived of essential nutrients for a long period of time. The result is either temporary or permanent nerve damage to the affected area.

Fraggle Rocker
07-23-06, 03:15 PM
The gas bubbles in the synovial fluid cause the tissue in the joints to swell. This reduces the flexibility of the joint and facilitates the progress of arthritis. Cracking knuckles (in the U.S. we call it "cracking" or sometimes "popping") keeps them more flexible, extends range of motion, and slows the advance of arthritis.

thedevilsreject
07-23-06, 04:01 PM
i also crack my knees and my big toes continously crack, is that harmful?

Fraggle Rocker
07-26-06, 06:57 PM
If they do it continuously it's something else. Gas bubbles in the synovial fluid pop and don't reappear for quite a while.

I can sometimes do that with one ankle, and sometimes with about six of the vertebrae in my neck. I don't know what it is but I've been doing it for decades and so far with no ill effects. I'll keep you posted. :)

riffyraine
08-04-06, 12:54 PM
i sometimes crack my fingers, around once every two days or so. and yes, sometimes my classmates find it unsightly of a girl to crack her fingers. I do it when i'm bored or stressed, and there are days that i don't experience those so i don't do it. sometimes my toes crack, but barely once a month.

fraggle, i find your ability of cracking your vertebra to be extremely intriguing, but if i were you i'd stop immediately. i know you haven't felt any bad effects, but who knows, it might affect your spinal chord or something. better safe than sorry. :)

UltiTruth
08-04-06, 01:52 PM
After a pop the gas should take half an hour to re-dissolve again so, until this happens, you will not be able to repeat the noise in that joint no matter how hard you try!
I can get a click in my toes every 5 minutes; and only at night! :(

UltiTruth
08-04-06, 01:56 PM
fraggle, i find your ability of cracking your vertebra to be extremely intriguing, but if i were you i'd stop immediately. i know you haven't felt any bad effects, but who knows, it might affect your spinal chord or something. better safe than sorry. :)

Or is it what is keeping him/her ticking?!

john smith
08-04-06, 03:32 PM
I'm forever trying to find different ways to 'click' or 'crunch' my back, often because it aches, and the clicking seems to help...dunno if it does tho....

thedevilsreject
08-04-06, 03:45 PM
I'm forever trying to find different ways to 'click' or 'crunch' my back, often because it aches, and the clicking seems to help...dunno if it does tho....
make sure that you dont slip a disc then

Hapsburg
08-06-06, 05:58 AM
Is clicking your finger (or any other) joints harmful?
How do you click a joint? If you mean popping one's knuckes, then...well, it probably has no real effect.

G. F. Schleebenhorst
08-06-06, 01:26 PM
I can "click" my sternum.

valich
08-08-06, 12:51 AM
Valich, thank you for your kind words. In answer to your query of what is happening to your foot when you use the computer and it falls asleep, we can answer that for you. Avatar was correct with his reply but to go into greater detail, when pressure is exerted upon your leg while at the computer you are applying pressure to an arteries therefore starving you’re your tissues with fresh glucose / oxygen carrying blood. As well as compressed arteries you could also be blocking nerve pathways, reducing the signal strength to the brain.
When you reopen these pathways some nerves fire hyperactively causing something which should feel like a burning or prickling sensation referred to as pins and needles. This in turn then fires an instinctive response in mammals to shake the affected part therefore increasing blood flow and minimising damage.
Taking drugs to excess, especially sedatives such as alcohol or opiates causes organisms to remain still for excessive periods of time, especially while sleeping. This can cause a condition known as Radial Neuropathy (emergency room staff prefer to call this Saturday Night Palsy) where areas are deprived of essential nutrients for a long period of time. The result is either temporary or permanent nerve damage to the affected area.

Wow! What an articulate, insightful indepth response! Thanks a lot Backslash! This explains a lot! Especially your analyses that then "the nerves fire hyperactively" causing a feeling like a burning or prickling or pins and needles. This gives me a lot to think about in reference to the nerve pain that I suffer in my arm, which is basically the same thing only much more intense. It has to be due to a "hyperactive" firing from the lacerated (avulsed) nerves inside my spine that now have nowhere else to go? I have to think about this one. Thanks a lot!

tedxenos
06-12-07, 08:38 PM
I was just searching and found this thread and immediatly signed up..

In addition to Backlash's previous response about feet falling asleep he is also correct. You do cut off the blood supply and pinch nerves creating a neuropathy. Is situations where your hand falls asleep you can actually shake your head from left to right (put your left ear to your left shoulder then right ear to right shoulder). A few shakes back and forth should aleviate symptoms. If this does not happen you should consult a neurologist, general practitioner, physical therapist, or a doctor of Chiropractic. For feet there are several major nerves that supply the lower body that actually run in the area where you sit. and supply the back of your legs and feet. Prolonged sitting can lead to damage. Most can tolerate it for up to 5 hours (a long car ride). Veins that bring blood back to the heart need muscles that surround them to push blood up from the lower limbs. When your foot falls asleep moving it up and down causes the major muscles around veins to push blood back to the heart. This should also aleviate symptoms.


Joint cavitation is the "cracking". It occurs in joint spaces just like valich said. It has not been proven to lead to arthritis. That story started when the medical society tried to knock down Chiropractors in the past for moving in on thier territory when they were just providing a different service.

Each bone that meets another bone has a fibers that attach directly to the bones and create a capsule where Synovial fluid provides a lubricant so that bones can slide past one another. The same way you swish around a cup of water and bubbles form the same occurs here. Since gasses take up more space than liquids the pressure increases. The rapid increase in space between the two bones allows for a rapid joining of these bubbles some say at the speed of sound. Just like when you slap water together and get a noise. If you feel pain and then relif after cavitating your joints it is because the pressure has built up to push on small nerves that surround these joints. The release allows for immediate relief and closing of these receptors. If there is no relief then the problem could be deeper than just the joint and capsule.

The only problem that could occur in a situation like this is inappropriate action. Excesive pulling on these joints with too much strength can cause a tear in these fibers that form your capsule. Nothing too serious but repeating this over long periods of time without allowing the joint to heal back up from even microsopic tears can lead to decreased strength and further damage.
The best way is to take your joint bring it to the end point were you think it shouldn't pass and it feels like it wont and then quickly pull with a small amount of force the speed is key. Cavitating joints should not be done slowly becasue that's when the pressure becomes detrimental. The same can be done with bones in the spine of your back, especially the lower back and around the neck. Chiropractors have a greater knowledge of this than i do and they would be the best ones to consult on further explinations. And trust me they are awsome at fixing back pain and helped me out emensly.

Good luck to all of you and for a small $30 in some states you can see a Chiropractor and aleviate your back, shoulder, neck, and limb pain.

XcitingStuart
05-16-11, 10:47 AM
I have to click my fingers or they'll go into an awkward pain, but I really want to stop or in some cases, lead to early arthuritus. Expeccially my right thumb, it clicks non-stop throughout the day. Please can someone give me some advise, email me at stuartmcgavin@rocketmail.com. Thank-You :confused::shrug::confused::