View Full Version : INDIA's contributions to the world


HighlyFanatic
11-13-01, 11:02 PM
I found this interesting...its long

WHAT SOME PEOPLE HAD TO SAY:

A . Albert Einstein said: We owe a lot to the Indians, who taught us how to count, without which no worthwhile scientific discovery could have been made.

B . Mark Twain said: India is the cradle of the human race, the birthplace of human speech, the mother of history,the grandmother of legend, and the great grand mother of tradition. Our most valuable and most constructive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India only.

C . French scholar Romain Rolland said: If there is one place on the face of earth where all the dreams of living men have found a home from the very earliest days when man began the dream of existence, it is India.


D . Hu Shih, former Ambassador of China to USA said:India conquered and dominated China culturally for 20 centuries without ever having to send a single soldier across her border.

"Many of the advances in the sciences
that we consider today to have been made in Europe
were in fact made in India centuries ago."

- Grant Duff
British Historian of India


"India was the motherland of our race
and Sanskrit the mother of Europe's languages.
India was the mother of our philosophy,
of much of our mathematics, of the ideals embodied in christianity... of self-government and democracy.
In many ways, Mother India is the mother of us all."
- Will Durant
- American Historian 1885-1981

CURRENT INFORMATION:

-There are 3.22 Million Indians in America. 38% of Doctors in America are Indians. 12% of Scientists in America are Indians. 36% of NASA employees are Indians. 34% of MICROSOFT employees are Indians 28% of IBM employees are Indians 17% of INTEL employees are Indians 13% of XEROX employees are Indians

-First democracy to elect a woman Prime Minister.
India is the 7th nuclear power in the world
India is the 5th largest economy in the world
India is the largest democracy in the world
India has the 2nd largest population in the world(could be a bad point)
India is the 4th nation in the world to have developed/or developing a nuclear submarine
India is the 5th nation in the world to be in the multi billion dollar space commerce business.
India is the 4th nation in the world to develop(or nearly to) ICBM's(can travel up to 14,000km)
India is the 3rd nation in the world, to be able to develop land based and sea based cruise missiles.

RELIGIOUS CONTRIBUTIONS
-gave the world Hinduism
-gave the world Bhuddism
-gave the world Sikhism

TECHNOLOGICAL/SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENTS
- the technique of algorithm used in computer science today.
- the science of algebra. (Indian's invented, Arabs took it when they invaded, and gave it to the then "primitive" Europeans)
- the concept of zero - on which ultimately rests the binary code which has given us all software including the WWW through which
you are accessing this site!
- the technique of manufacturing crystal (sugar)cane sugar
(the word sugar is derived from the Sanskrit term "Sharkara").
- the making of camphor (MODERN chemists know how important this chemical is).
- the making of tin (the technical English word for tin
is Cassiterite which is said to have been derived from the Sanskrit term
"Kasthira").
-believe it or not, Kung Fu is a derivation of Yoga---taught to the Chinese by an Indian Bhuddist Monk known as Bodidharma (ask any Kung Fu Grand Master, or check the internet for yourself).
-The earliest recorded use of copperware in India has been around 3000 B.C. the findings at Mohen-jo-daro and Harappa, bear this out The earliest documented observation of smelting of metals in India is by Greek Historians in the 4th Century B.C.

A .India never invaded any country in her last 10000 years of history.

B.India invented the Number System. Zero was invented by Aryabhatta.

C .The World's first university was established in Takshila in 700BC. more than 10,500 students from all over the world studied more than 60 subjects. The University of Nalanda built in the 4th century BC was one of the greatest achievements of ancient India in the field of education.

D .Sanskrit is the mother of all the European languages. Sanskrit is the most suitable language for computer software reported in Forbes magazine, July 1987.

E .Ayurveda is the earliest school of medicine known to humans.Charaka, the father of medicine consolidated Ayurveda 2500 years ago. Today Ayurveda is fast regaining its rightful place in our civilization.


F .Although modern images of India often show poverty and lack of development, India was the richest country on earth until the time of British invasion in the early 17th Century.

G .The art of Navigation was born in the river Sindh 6000 years ago. The very word Navigation is derived from the Sanskrit word NAVGATIH. The word navy is also derived from Sanskrit 'Nou'.

H .Bhaskaracharya calculated the time taken by the earth to orbit the sun hundreds of years before the astronomer Smart.; Time taken by earth to orbit the sun: (5th century) 365.258756484 days.

I .The value of pi was first calculated by Budhayana, and he explained the concept of what is known as the Pythagorean Theorem. He discovered this in the 6th century long before the European mathematicians.

J .Algebra, trigonometry and calculus came from India; Quadratic equations were by Sridharacharya in the 11th Century;The largest numbers the Greeks and the Romans used were 10**6(10 to the power of 6) whereas Hindus used numbers as big as 10**53(10 to the power of 53) with specific names as early
as 5000 BCE during the Vedic period. Even today, the largest used number is Tera 10**12(10 to the power of 12).

K .According to the Gemological Institute of America, up until 1896, India was the only source for diamonds to the world.

L .USA based IEEE has proved what has been a century-old suspicion in the world scientific community that the pioneer of Wireless communication was Prof. Jagdeesh Bose and not Marconi.

M .The earliest reservoir and dam for irrigation was built in Saurashtra.

N .According to Saka King Rudradaman I of 150 CE a beautiful lake called 'Sudarshana' was constructed on the hills of Raivataka during Chandragupta Maurya's time.

O .Chess (Shataranja or AshtaPada) was invented in India.

P .Sushruta is the father of surgery. 2600 years ago he and health scientists of his time conducted complicated surgeries like cesareans, cataract, artificial limbs, fractures, urinary stones and even plastic surgery and brain surgery.Usage of anesthesia was well known in ancient India. Over 125 surgical equipment were used.Deep knowledge of anatomy, physiology, etiology,mbryology,digestion, metabolism, genetics and immunity is also found in many texts.

Q .When many cultures were only nomadic forest dwellers over 5000 years ago, Indians established Harappan culture in Sindhu Valley(Indus Valley Civilization)

R .The place value system, the decimal system was developed in India in 100 BC.

I cant think anymore...dammit
Here's a list of some Indians in tech companies

Ken Bajaj CEO AppNet
P. Kaul CEO Hughes Network Systems (HNS)

Krishna Kushwaha Executive Vice President,
Research and Development cybercash

Sanju Bansal co-founder & COO MicroStrategy.

Rakesh Gangwal CEO US AirWays

Sanjay Kumar President and COO , computer associates

Ram Mukunda Chairman and CEO Startec

Reggie Aggarwal, Founder and CEO cvent.com

Bijan Moaveni Chief Operating Officer eglobe

Pat Sheehy – SVP, Marketing, Sales and Production Freddie Mac

Srinija Srinivasan - cofounder and Vice President Yahoo.

Amar Bose - of the almighty Bose sound systems.

Victor Menezes, soon to be head of Citibank, currently head of global operations.

Jim Wadia - head of Arthur Andersen (yes, Indians head both McKinsey & Andersen).

did i already say 36% of NASA employees are Indians

1. Steven Kapoor a.k.a Apache Indian, world hits "Boom Shak-a-lak" Top 10 on UK charts, Top 50 on US charts, OST Dumb n Dumber.

2. Jas Mann, lead singer for Babylon Zoo, dominated UK charts for weeks with "Spaceman", OST Mortal Kombat Anhilliation.

3. *forgot the name* The lead guitarist for No Doubt is an Indian

one-third of the engineers in Silicon Valley are of Indian descent, while 7% of its high-tech firms are led by an Indian ceo. Some success stories are well known, such as Vinod Khosla, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, and Sabeer Bhatia, who founded Hotmail and sold it to Microsoft for $400 million. The number of New Economy millionaires of Indian descent is now in the thousands. Massachusetts' Gururaj Deshpande, co-founder of a number of network technology companies, is worth between $4 billion and $6 billion. Says Krish Prabhu, ceo of French telecom giant Alcatel's U.S. operations: "Indians have succeeded in the high-tech field, and don't face that glass ceiling now. They have a proven track record."

Six Indians led by Azim Hasham Premji of Wipro are among 39 “tech billionaires” outside the United States, more than half of them having achieved the status since July last, according the authoritative financial magazine “Forbes Global”.
Japan with 15 billionaires has the maximum number in the category followed by India and Germany with six each. Taiwan and Britain have two each. Honk Kong, France, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Israel, Spain and Sweden account for one each. (a little outdated now, from Reuter's i think)

Here's a couple other top websites started by Indians:

Infospace--top directory on the web

epinions--top review site

AskMe.com--one of top help sites

Exodus--top hosting service in world

Imandi.com--top reverse-marketing site


· Chess (Shataranja or AshtaPada) was invented in India.

· Sushruta is the father of surgery. 2600 years ago he and health

· scientists of his time conducted complicated surgeries like cesareans, contracts, artificial legs, fractures, urinary stones and even plastic surgery and brain surgery. Usage of anesthesia was well known in ancient India. Over 125 surgical equipments were used. Deep knowledge of anatomy physiology, etiology, embryology, digestion, metabolism, genetics and immunity is also found in many texts.

· When Europeans were only nomadic forest dwellers over 5000 years ago, Indians established Harappan culture in Sindhu Valley (Indus Valley Civilization)

· The place value system, the decimal system was developed in India in100 BC.

-believe it or not, India has a space program (some critics have put it at par with the Canadian program)

HighlyFanatic
11-13-01, 11:21 PM
Equations and Symbols

B.B. Dutta writes: "The use of symbols-letters of the alphabet to denote unknowns, and equations are the foundations of the science of algebra. The Hindus were the first to make systematic use of the letters of the alphabet to denote unknowns. They were also the first to classify and make a detailed study of equations. Thus they may be said to have given birth to the modern science of algebra." [7] The great Indian mathematician Bhaskaracharya (1150 C.E.) produced extensive treatises on both plane and spherical trigonometry and algebra, and his works contain remarkable solutions of problems which were not discovered in Europe until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He preceded Newton by over 500 years in the discovery of the principles of differential calculus. A.L. Basham writes further, "The mathematical implications of zero (sunya) and infinity, never more than vaguely realized by classical authorities, were fully understood in medieval India. Earlier mathematicians had taught that X/0 = X, but Bhaskara proved the contrary. He also established mathematically what had been recognized in Indian theology at least a millennium earlier: that infinity, however divided, remains infinite, represented by the equation oo /X = oo." In the 14th century, Madhava, isolated in South India, developed a power series for the arc tangent function, apparently without the use of calculus, allowing the calculation of pi to any number of decimal places (since arctan 1 = pi/4). Whether he accomplished this by inventing a system as good as calculus or without the aid of calculus; either way it is astonishing.

Spiritually advanced cultures were not ignorant of the principles of mathematics, but they saw no necessity to explore those principles beyond that which was helpful in the advancement of God realization.

By the fifteenth century C.E. use of the new mathematical concepts from India had spread all over Europe to Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, among others. A.L. Basham states also that

The debt of the Western world to India in this respect [the field of mathematics] cannot be overestimated. Most of the great discoveries and inventions of which Europe is so proud would have been impossible without a developed system of mathematics, and this in turn would have been impossible if Europe had been shackled by the unwieldy system of Roman numerals. The unknown man who devised the new system was, from the world's point of view, after the Buddha, the most important son of India. His achievement, though easily taken for granted, was the work of an analytical mind of the first order, and he deserves much more honor than he has so far received.

Unfortunately, Eurocentrism has effectively concealed from the common man the fact that we owe much in the way of mathematics to ancient India. Reflection on this may cause modern man to consider more seriously the spiritual preoccupation of ancient India. The rishis (seers) were not men lacking in practical knowledge of the world, dwelling only in the realm of imagination. They were well developed in secular knowledge, yet only insofar as they felt it was necessary within a world view in which consciousness was held as primary.

In ancient India, mathematics served as a bridge between understanding material reality and the spiritual conception. Vedic mathematics differs profoundly from Greek mathematics in that knowledge for its own sake (for its aesthetic satisfaction) did not appeal to the Indian mind. The mathematics of the Vedas lacks the cold, clear, geometric precision of the West; rather, it is cloaked in the poetic language which so distinguishes the East. Vedic mathematicians strongly felt that every discipline must have a purpose, and believed that the ultimate goal of life was to achieve self-realization and love of God and thereby be released from the cycle of birth and death. Those practices which furthered this end either directly or indirectly were practiced most rigorously. Outside of the religio-astronomical sphere, only the problems of day to day life (such as purchasing and bartering) interested the Indian mathematicians.

HighlyFanatic
11-13-01, 11:26 PM
I wear the swastika as part of my Vedic ancestry....interestingly enough, i found this

Atomic theory is an ancient science. The earliest record of it can be found in Vedic texts from india which are many thousands of years old.

Legend has it that the Vedic civilisation was highly advanced. The sages that oversaw its development, through their mystic insight and deep meditation, discovered the ancient symbols of spirituality: Aumkara and Swastika. They also discovered many scientific principles that they applied to develop a highly advanced technology. They gave the atom its sanskrit name "Anu".

While the technical achievements of this ancient civilisation have been forgotten the archetypal symbols of spirituality have maintained their eminence in our consciousness. Now, thanks to advances in modern atomic theory, the atomic basis of these divine symbols can be appreciated.

Western theories of the atom took shape in the 18th and 19th century. At the beginning of the 19th century, John Dalton theorised that an atom was an indivisible particle of an element. However, after the electron was discovered in 1897, and then the proton several years later, the atom model was revised. In 1909, Ernest Rutherford showed that atoms were mostly empty space, revising the model of an atom to a tight positive nucleus containing the protons and neutrons with electrons around it; by 1913, Danish physicist Neils Bohr envisioned a planetary arrangement in which the electrons orbited the nucleus at different energy levels.

The current way of describing an electron is a model called the charge cloud model/quantum mechanical model/orbital model. This model based on the idea of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, which states that we do not know the precise location or the velocity of any given electron. The model uses indistinct and overlapping "probability clouds" to approximate the position of an electron.

Where a cloud is dense, the probability of finding an electron in that vicinity is low. In this model, each electron energy level is denoted by numbers that take concentric shells as suggested by the Bohr model because there are overlaps in the ordering of the energy levels.

In the case of the carbon atom the electrons occupy four tear drop shaped clouds in a tetrahedron-like arrangement. These clouds represent the areas in which the electrons spend most of their time. They move so rapidly in this zone that they form a cloud rather than a specific flight path

Recently a number of researchers have suggested that within these clouds exist specific zones that the electrons favour. These zones form a spiral around the surface of each of the tear drop shaped clouds.

This new development came into the attention of a great Indian saint and mystic. Disciples were encouraged to develop the principle as it related to the carbon atom.In deep meditation one of those disciples, who was a chemist,spontaneously realised the true significance of this theory:

The electron's high probability zone formed spiral standing waves around the carbon atom's nucleus. When this configuration was viewed from certain angles the physicist was surprised to find that the spirals formed recognisable symbols.

In the first view a 3–dimensional Aumkara could be seen. From a different angle that Aumkara became a flat, 2-dimensional Swastika. The Swastika, he concluded, was actually 2-D representation of the 3-D aumkara.

Rotating the model to another angle shows those symbols change into the Greek Alpha and Omega. At a cosmic level the symbols of Eastern spirituality (Aumkara and Swastika) are literally and only different aspects of the same spiritual truth that is also represented by the symbols of Western spirituality (Alpha and Omega).

All people, objects and even energy itself are expressions of the same divinity that so many religions, cultures and philosophies have tried to claim exclusively as their own.

The Carbon atom, by containing within it these universal symbols, demonstrates that matter is a manifestation of the same Divine consciousness experienced by the saints and sages of all history. Matter is innately spiritual.

The Universe does not exist separately from the Universal Consciousness; it is a direct expression of it.

Living matter, which is carbon based, must have a unique role in this expression. A saint is one who lives in eternal experience of this all pervading divine purpose.

All people, objects and even energy itself are expressions of the same divinity

The alpha and omega are traditionally ascribed to Christ. In india the Deity called Ganesha presides over the Swastika and Aumkara.

There are some remarkable similarities between the two:
Both deities demonstrate the value of childlike innocence; Ganesha is himself an eternal child famous for his simple wisdom ;while Christ, son of god, often exhorted his disciples to "be as little children";

They both are divine children; both conceived immaculately;, both divine sons of a holy trinity (Christ is the son of Yahweh and The Holy Spirit/Mary and Ganesha son of Lord Shiva and Mother Parvati).

Are Ganesha and Christ the one and the same deity?

Each, like their symbols that exist as different aspects of the carbon atom, represent different aspects of the archetypal cosmic child.

Thus the distinction between Eastern and Western spirituality, like any division based on race,culture or belief, is no more than ignorance of the true spiritual nature of the universe and all that exists within it.

http://www.sol.com.au/kor/11_02.htm

Pollux V
11-14-01, 08:18 AM
Could you condense what you've said into a paragraph?
Theres a little secret about sciforums: People don't read long posts!

kmguru
11-14-01, 09:30 AM
What he meant to say is that INDIANS WERE SMART. They are the victim of their own success. Preaching and practicing peace did not help them. Moguls invaded, then the British and everything went to hell....

Moral of the story is "Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty" - otherwise you lose.

Chagur
11-14-01, 11:52 AM
Surprised you didn't mention S. Chandrasekhar, Nobel laureate, who, in '83, won a Nobel prize for his contribution to understanding stellar evolution.

Compline
12-12-07, 10:35 AM
A question for Highlyfanatic: Somehow I feel that this originated with India. Do you know if this statement true? :-
"The Arabs are ultimately responsible for the fact that mathematicians the world over today use the letter 'x' to designate the unknown quantity – 'x' being the first letter of the Spanish word xay, which is a deformation of the Arabic shay, meaning simply 'thing'."

Compline
12-13-07, 12:21 PM
Second statement for HighlyFanatic, because I think the Indian contribution is being usurped but have no facts to prove it:
"Mathematics
Bold experiments and unique innovations in the field of mathematics were carried out by Muslim mathematicians who developed this science to an exceptionally high degree. Algebra may be said to have been invented by the Greeks, but according to Oelsner, "it was confined to furnishing amusement for the plays of the goblet" Muslims developed it and applied it to higher purposes.
Thus, The first great Muslim mathematician, Al-Khawarizmi, invented the subject of algebra (al-Jabr), which was further developed by others, most notably Umar Khayyam. Al-Khawarizmi's work, in Latin translation, brought the Arabic numerals along with the mathematics to Europe, through Spain. The word "algorithm" is derived from his name.

The Muslims invented the symbol for zero (The word "cipher" comes from Arabic sifr), and they organized the numbers into the decimal system - base 10. Additionally, they invented the symbol to express an unknown quantity, i.e. variables like x.

They invented spherical trigonometry, discovered the tangent and were first, "to introduce the sine of arc in Trigonometrical Calculations" Zero is an invaluable addition made to mathematical science by the Muslims. They have also shown remarkable progress in mathematical geography."

leopold
12-13-07, 01:23 PM
A question for Highlyfanatic: . . .


Second statement for HighlyFanatic, . . .
the thread is 6 years old, i seriously doubt if any answers are going to be given.

S.A.M.
12-13-07, 01:41 PM
Me.

kmguru
12-13-07, 08:11 PM
The Muslims invented the symbol for zero (The word "cipher" comes from Arabic sifr), and they organized the numbers into the decimal system - base 10. Additionally, they invented the symbol to express an unknown quantity, i.e. variables like x.

The nr. zero was invented independently in India and
by the Maya. In India a decimal system was used, like
ours, but they used an empty space for zero up to 3rd
Century BC. This was confusing for an empty space was
also used to separate numbers, and so they invented
the dot for a zero. The first evidence for the use of
the symbol that we now know as zero stems from the 7th
century AD. The Maya invented the number zero for
their calendars in the 3rd century AD.
The number zero reached European civilisation through
the Arabs after 800 AD. The Greek and Roman did not
need the number zero for they did their calculations
on an abacus. The name 'zero' comes from the arabic
'sifr'.
(Data from the book "the calender" by D. E. Duncan).

LINK (http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen99/gen99535.htm)

kmguru
12-13-07, 08:17 PM
Author: elizabeth
Who founded algebra?

Response #: 1 of 1
Author: chaffer
No one person appears to have invented algebra in all its complexity and
glory. Instead, it appears to have sort of "grown up." Western Europeans
learned their algebra from the works of the Persian mathematician Muhammed ibn Musa al-Khowarizmi. The word, algebra, is a corruption of al-jabr which is part of the title of his treatise, Hisab al-jabr w'al muqabalah which means something like, "the science of reunion and reduction." It is pretty clear that the Persians got some of these ideas from earlier work of the Babylonians, Egyptians, Chinese, Hindus, and who knows else.

same site as before

kmguru
12-13-07, 08:21 PM
Mayan

http://www.crystalinks.com/mazero.gifZero

kmguru
12-13-07, 08:25 PM
The term 'arabic numerals' was coined by Westerners who didn't understand where the Arabs got their numerals from. The Arabs themselves got them from the Hindus, including the zero. Al-Khwarizmi was the first Arab to describe the Hindu numerals. He wrote about them in his book "On the Calculation with Hindu Numerals" in 825AD.

This was followed by al-Kindi who wrote "On the Use of the Indian Numerals" (Ketab fi Isti'mal al-'Adad al-Hindi) about 830AD. The fact that the Arabs themselves acknowledge their numerals are Hindu numerals is the term they give their numerals: ÃÑÞÇã åäÏíÉ arqam hindiyyah which literally means 'Hindu numerals'. The concept of Zero as a number, not just as an empty place holder, was invented by the Hindus.

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/HistTopics/Zero.html

nietzschefan
12-13-07, 08:27 PM
Oppenheimer quoted the Gita regarding the Manhattan Project:


We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, "Now I am become Death(Time), the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.

kmguru
12-13-07, 08:35 PM
While zero was used during the period of Gautama Buddha, I could not find any specific reference on the net. May be others would have better luck. That would put Zero around 700 BC - whether in India or China.

kmguru
12-13-07, 08:39 PM
...
Recalling the scene, Oppenheimer said: "A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. There floated through my mind a line from the "Bhagavad-Gita" in which Krishna is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty: "I am become death: the destroyer of worlds."

Compline
12-14-07, 06:52 AM
Thank you very much for taking the trouble to reply and give me some good leads.
Anyone know where Highly Fanatic is? As he is so partial to things Indian I thought he might know the answers to the Indian contribution, objectivity aside and acceptably so.

Karan G
09-15-08, 05:49 AM
Some more stuff about India:

# India never invaded any country in her last 100000 years of history.

# When many cultures were only nomadic forest dwellers over 5000 years ago, Indians established Harappan culture in Sindhu Valley (Indus Valley Civilization)

# The name 'India' is derived from the River Indus, the valleys around which were the home of the early settlers. The Aryan worshippers referred to the river Indus as the Sindhu.

# The Persian invaders converted it into Hindu. The name `Hindustan' combines Sindhu and Hindu and thus refers to the land of the Hindus.

# Chess was invented in India.

# Algebra, Trigonometry and Calculus are studies, which originated in India.

# The 'Place Value System' and the 'Decimal System' were developed in India in 100 B.C.

# The World's First Granite Temple is the Brihadeswara Temple at Tanjavur, Tamil Nadu. The shikhara of the temple is made from a single 80-tonne piece of granite. This magnificent temple was built in just five years, (between 1004 AD and 1009 AD) during the reign of Rajaraja Chola.

# India is the largest democracy in the world, the 6th largest Country in the world, and one of the most ancient civilizations.

# The game of Snakes & Ladders was created by the 13th century poet saint Gyandev. It was originally called 'Mokshapat'. The ladders in the game represented virtues and the snakes indicated vices. The game was played with cowrie shells and dices. In time, the game underwent several modifications, but its meaning remained the same, i.e. good deeds take people to heaven and evil to a cycle of re-births.

# The world's highest cricket ground is in Chail, Himachal Pradesh. Built in 1893 after leveling a hilltop, this cricket pitch is 2444 meters above sea level.

# India has the largest number of Post Offices in the world.

# The largest employer in the world is the Indian Railways, employing over a million people.

# The world's first university was established in Takshila in 700 BC. More than 10,500 students from all over the world studied more than 60 subjects. The University of Nalanda built in the 4th century was one of the greatest achievements of ancient India in the field of education.

# Ayurveda is the earliest school of medicine known to mankind. The Father of Medicine, Charaka, consolidated Ayurveda 2500 years ago.

# India was one of the richest countries till the time of British rule in the early 17th Century. Christopher Columbus, attracted by India's wealth, had come looking for a sea route to India when he discovered America by mistake.

# The Art of Navigation & Navigating was born in the river Sindh over 6000 years ago. The very word Navigation is derived from the Sanskrit word 'NAVGATIH'. The word navy is also derived from the Sanskrit word 'Nou'.

# Bhaskaracharya rightly calculated the time taken by the earth to orbit the Sun hundreds of years before the astronomer Smart. According to his calculation, the time taken by the Earth to orbit the Sun was 365.258756484 days.

# The value of "pi" was first calculated by the Indian Mathematician Budhayana, and he explained the concept of what is known as the Pythagorean Theorem. He discovered this in the 6th century, long before the European mathematicians.

# Algebra, Trigonometry and Calculus also originated in India. Quadratic Equations were used by Sridharacharya in the 11th century. The largest numbers the Greeks and the Romans used were 106 whereas Hindus used numbers as big as 10*53 (i.e. 10 to the power of 53) with specific names as early as 5000 B.C. during the Vedic period. Even today, the largest used number is Terra: 10*12(10 to the power of 12).

# Until 1896, India was the only source of diamonds in the world (Source : Gemological Institute of America).

# The Baily Bridge is the highest bridge in the world. It is located in the Ladakh valley between the Dras and Suru rivers in the Himalayan mountains. It was built by the Indian Army in August 1982.

# Sushruta is regarded as the Father of Surgery. Over 2600 years ago Sushrata & his team conducted complicated surgeries like cataract, artificial limbs, cesareans, fractures, urinary stones, plastic surgery and brain surgeries.

# Usage of anaesthesia was well known in ancient Indian medicine. Detailed knowledge of anatomy, embryology, digestion, metabolism, physiology, etiology, genetics and immunity is also found in many ancient Indian texts.

# India exports software to 90 countries.

# The four religions born in India - Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism, are followed by 25% of the world's population.

# Jainism and Buddhism were founded in India in 600 B.C. and 500 B.C. respectively.

# Islam is India's and the world's second largest religion.

# There are 300,000 active mosques in India, more than in any other country, including the Muslim world.

# The oldest European church and synagogue in India are in the city of Cochin. They were built in 1503 and 1568 respectively.

# Jews and Christians have lived continuously in India since 200 B.C. and 52 A.D. respectively

# The largest religious building in the world is Angkor Wat, a Hindu Temple in Cambodia built at the end of the 11th century.

# The Vishnu Temple in the city of Tirupathi built in the 10th century, is the world's largest religious pilgrimage destination. Larger than either Rome or Mecca, an average of 30,000 visitors donate $6 million (US) to the temple everyday.

# Sikhism originated in the Holy city of Amritsar in Punjab. Famous for housing the Golden Temple, the city was founded in 1577.

# Varanasi, also known as Benaras, was called "the Ancient City" when Lord Buddha visited it in 500 B.C., and is the oldest, continuously inhabited city in the world today.

# India provides safety for more than 300,000 refugees originally from Sri Lanka, Tibet, Bhutan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh, who escaped to flee religious and political persecution.

# His Holiness, the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists, runs his government in exile from Dharmashala in northern India.

# Martial Arts were first created in India, and later spread to Asia by Buddhist missionaries.

# Yoga has its origins in India and has existed for over 5,000 years.

Karan G
09-15-08, 05:52 AM
Some More Quotes

Albert Einstein, German Scientist: "We owe a lot to the Indians, who taught us how to count, without which no worthwhile scientific discovery could have been made!"

Mark Twain, American Author: "India is the cradle of the human race, the birthplace of human speech, the mother of history, the grandmother of legend, and the great grand mother of tradition. Our most valuable and most astrictive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India only!"

"So far as I am able to judge, nothing has been left undone, either by man or nature, to make India the most extraordinary country that the sun visits on his rounds. Nothing seems to have been forgotten, nothing overlooked."

"In religion, India is the only millionaire... the One land that all men desire to see, and having seen once, by even a glimpse, would not give that glimpse for all the shows of all the rest of the globe combined."

Will Durant, American Historian: “It is true that even across the Himalayan barrier India has sent to the west, such gifts as grammar and logic, philosophy and fables, hypnotism and chess, and above all numerals and the decimal system.”

"India will teach us the tolerance and gentleness of mature mind, understanding spirit and a unifying, pacifying love for all human beings."

"India is the motherland of our race and Sanskrit is the mother of Indo-European languages. She is the mother of our philosophy, of our mathematics, mother of ideals embodied in Christianity and mother of our democracy. Mother India is in many ways the mother of us all." (‘Story of Civilization’)

Henry David Thoreau, American Thinker /Author: Whenever I have read any part of the Vedas, I have felt that some unearthly and unknown light illuminated me. In the great teaching of the Vedas, there is no touch of sectarianism. It is of all ages, climbs, and nationalities and is the royal road for the attainment of the Great Knowledge. When I read it, I feel that I am under the spangled heavens of a summer night.

R.W. Emerson, American Author: In the great books of India, an empire spoke to us, nothing small or unworthy, but large, serene, consistent, the voice of an old intelligence, which in another age and climate had pondered and thus disposed of the questions that exercise us.

William James, American Author: "From the Vedas we learn a practical art of surgery, medicine, music, house building under which mechanized art is included. They are encyclopedia of every aspect of life, culture, religion, science, ethics, law, cosmology and meteorology."

Max Muller, German Scholar: "If I were to look over the whole world to find out a country most richly endowed with all the wealth, power and beauty that nature can bestow – in some part a very paradise on earth – I should point to India."

"There is no book in the world that is so thrilling, stirring and inspiring as the Upanishads." (‘Sacred Books of the East’)

Romain Rolland, French Philosopher: If there is one place on the face of this Earth where all the dreams of living men have found a home from the very earliest day when man began the dream of existence, it is India.

Apollonius Tyanaeus, Ancient Greek Traveler: "In India, I found a race of mortals living upon the Earth, but not adhering to it, inhabiting cities, but not being fixed to them, possessing everything, but possessed by nothing."

Dr Arnold Toynbee, British Historian: “It is already becoming clear that a chapter which had a Western beginning will have to have an Indian ending if it is not to end in the self-destruction of the human race. At this supremely dangerous moment in history, the only way of salvation for mankind is the Indian way.”

Hu Shih (Former Chinese Ambassador to USA): "India conquered and dominated China for 20 centuries without ever having to send a single soldier across its border." (Bhavan Journal 15.05.1999)

Swami Vivekananda, Indian Philosopher: "Civilizations have arisen in other parts of the world. In ancient and modern times, wonderful ideas have been carried forward from one race to another...But mark you, my friends, it has been always with the blast of war trumpets and the march of embattled cohorts. Each idea had to be soaked in a deluge of blood..... Each word of power had to be followed by the groans of millions, by the wails of orphans, by the tears of widows. This, many other nations have taught; but India for thousands of years peacefully existed. Here activity prevailed when even Greece did not exist... Even earlier, when history has no record, and tradition dares not peer into the gloom of that intense past, even from until now, ideas after ideas have marched out from her, but every word has been spoken with a blessing behind it and peace before it. We, of all nations of the world, have never been a conquering race, and that blessing is on our head, and therefore we live....!"

Shri Aurovindo: "India of the ages is not dead nor has she spoken her last creative word; she lives and has still something to do for herself and the human peoples. And that which must seek now to awake is not anglicised oriental people, docile pupil of the West and doomed to repeat the cycle of the occident's success and failure, but still the ancient immemorable Shakti recovering her deepest self, lifting her head higher towards the supreme source of light and strength and turning to discover the complete meaning and a vaster form of her Dharma."

Sir William Jones, British Orientalist: "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity is of wonderful structure, more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either."

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 06:18 AM
We've learned alot from sharks too, and rats, not to mention rape hounds and job-stealer birds.

John99
09-15-08, 06:37 AM
You are quoting non-Indians to prove how smart Indians are?

If we were to actually believe that one group of people were smarter than another, which there is no physical reason to believe this to be the case, then i wonder what group of people would be considered the dumbest.

Humans must be the most peculiar beings in the universe. But hey, dont let me stop anyone from patting themselves on the back.

John99
09-15-08, 06:41 AM
A . Albert Einstein said: We owe a lot to the Indians, who taught us how to count, without which no worthwhile scientific discovery could have been made.

I started reading threads five minutes ago and already i have read two horrifically stupid statements.

And i dont care who said it.

Spud Emperor
09-15-08, 06:58 AM
The art of blending spices (they are the best).

Sachin Tendulkar.

The best accent to mimic in a comic fashion( complete with nodding head and subtle finger movements).

Kabardi.

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 07:27 AM
I honestly HATE all indian food, and I'm a qualified chef, with diverse tastes, but I can objectively say that indian food is bullshit.
Did you know hot food becomes addictive purely because it destroys the taste buds and the brain releases chemicals to combat this damage,it is these chemicals we become addicted to. So basically people who smugly say they love indian food are just dumb arseholes whose mouths don't work properly anymore.
The first time you have it is the only honest reaction you will have, and that is one of disgust, anger and confusion.

Indians were ultimately so terrible at the fine art of cuisine they had to give up, destroy their mouths and become addicted to the pain of eating bad food, just to get some semblance of enjoyment from feeding. What idiotic cunts.

Spud Emperor
09-15-08, 07:41 AM
I honestly HATE all indian food, and I'm a qualified chef, with diverse tastes, but I can objectively say that indian food is bullshit.
Did you know hot food becomes addictive purely because it destroys the taste buds and the brain releases chemicals to combat this damage,it is these chemicals we become addicted to. So basically people who smugly say they love indian food are just dumb arseholes whose mouths don't work properly anymore.
The first time you have it is the only honest reaction you will have, and that is one of disgust, anger and confusion.

Indians were ultimately so terrible at the fine art of cuisine they had to give up, destroy their mouths and become addicted to the pain of eating bad food, just to get some semblance of enjoyment from feeding. What idiotic cunts.

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!

A Chef who thinks all Indian food is hot...mmm! bright boy!

Hot food destroys your taste buds. Killing us with science!

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 07:43 AM
Hot food destroys your taste buds. Killing us with science!
Are you suggesting it's not a fact?


A Chef who thinks all Indian food is hot...mmm! bright boy!
Well it's not popular amongst pompous morons for the stale bread, I'm just cutting to the chase.

Spud Emperor
09-15-08, 07:51 AM
Are you suggesting it's not a fact?



If it is it's barely noticeable and not eating chillies would be like a life without sex.

Eat your chickenshit, whitebread soulless diet Lou, your loss.

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 08:03 AM
Like I said, my diet is extremely diverse, I just don't eat stupidly hot food because it's an ignorant and physically detrimental thing to do.

It's the common mistake of the wannabe-cultured cashed up lower class to eat hot food and believe it makes him an aristocrat.
You should be able to detect subtle flavours in food, you redfaced buffoon.

I'm not saying I don't eat "jalapeno peppers" and the like, but the heat of many indian and indonesian dishes are so hot only because the people who eat them have completely fucked their pallettes and need increasingly absurd heat to feel anything at all, they can no longer "taste", so I don't see how it's anything to be proud of.
I wouldn't bother saying anything about it if the people who ate hot food weren't so damned arrogant, like they have some sophistication the rest of us lack, they purely and simply don't have operational taste buds anymore, that's all it is.

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 08:05 AM
Ignoramus; compare a dosai to a burger? PooH!

http://papadspices.com/i/dosai_big.jpg

Spud Emperor
09-15-08, 08:07 AM
Dr Lou has PMS....again!

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 08:09 AM
He needs a good Indian thali

http://www.woodlandsusa.com/images/thali2.JPG

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 08:18 AM
It's shit, your primitive strategy of "put heaps of dangerously decomposed garbage into a wok and then drown it in capsaicin so we can't taste it, and hope we survive or at least develop a tolerance to the bacteria through natural selection, like beasts" is an embarrassingly archaic approach to food, shame on you sam, shame on you and your embarrassing people.

shorty_37
09-15-08, 08:19 AM
Is that why they usually smell so bad, when you are standing next to them?
All this crap they eat is seeping out their pores. :shrug:

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 08:24 AM
It's shit, your primitive strategy of "put heaps of dangerously decomposed garbage into a wok and then drown it in capsaicin so we can't taste it, and hope we survive or at least develop a tolerance to the bacteria through natural selection, like beasts" is an embarrassingly archaic approach to food, shame on you sam, shame on you and your embarrassing people.

Heh, I remember the first time I ate an European meal. Boiled fish, boiled cabbage, boiled meat. :puke:
Most of them think sugar is a spice and add it to meat!
No wonder the British call curry an English meal. :D


Is that why they usually smell so bad, when you are standing next to them?
All this crap they eat is seeping out their pores. :shrug:

Nah thats because most of them don't know that westerners think artificial smells are pheromones.

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 08:31 AM
No wonder the British call curry an English meal.
Yeah, fucking idiotic chav peasants. It appeals to morons who eat shit food, it's admittedly better than nothing to get an addictive jolt of pain from food, but it's not better than real food that actually tastes good.

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 08:32 AM
Yeah, fucking idiotic chav peasants. It appeals to morons who eat shit food, it's admittedly better than nothing to get an addictive jolt of pain from food, but it's not better than real food that actually tastes good.

You're obviously one of those pansies who can't eat spicy foods without getting the runs.

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 08:45 AM
Yeah that's the classic retort from ignorant morons, and I'm explaining how it's bullshit.
I do find very hot food (especially indian) unpleasant, yes, all humans should, if you don't you have severely damaged taste buds and automatically are incapable of appreciating the subtle nuances of fine cuisine.
I don't see how that's something to be proud of.

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 09:03 AM
Yeah yeah, keep munching on tasteless food and call yourself a gourmet, if you will.

No spice, no dice.

Dr Lou Natic
09-15-08, 09:21 AM
You're a joke to me, you spice food to death because you don't have high quality fresh ingredients or the intelligence to use them, bottom line, next thing you'll be saying indians bathe in the ganges due to the skin-nourishing properties of human fecal matter. The reality ofcourse is that your people are third world scumbags who shit where they drink and bathe because they lack the conscious sentience of true human beings.
You do what a cow would do- there's some water, let's shit in it, hey there's some water, let's drink it and bathe in it, just totally unconscious reactions to stimulai, like beasts.

Double shame on you.
Leave it to idealistic western hippies to try and romanticise the flaws of your culture, you're better served hanging your head in shame.

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 09:26 AM
You're a joke to me, you spice food to death because you don't have high quality fresh ingredients or the intelligence to use them

You're kidding right? Lets see:

Morning:

Bread: Bakers' assistant rides in on bike at 5 a.m. with fresh bread from oven
Milk: Milkman comes at 5:30 with milk that came from Jogeshwari at 4 a.m. Not treated in any way. Thick one inch cream layer on heating.
Eggs: bought twice a week from the chicken guy in the market, with dark orange [not pale yellow] yolks.

Mid-morning: Ma goes to market [or did when she was living]
Fresh produce: sold by farmers in the market

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/02/09/business/09market.600.jpg

Meat: slaughtered that morning, sold by the butcher only from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Chicken: pick out live bird, get it killed and plucked in 15 minutes.

Fish: obtained from the boats that morning [you can go to the docks at 5 a.m. to get it cheap and in bulk]. But still completely fresh at 10 a.m.

Sold by the fishermen.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/35/104784323_91e23bfef7.jpg

American produce, meat, chicken tastes like paper in comparison.

Steve100
09-15-08, 10:41 AM
My taste buds must be massacred, because that chicken balti I had a taste of yesterday was not spicy at all.

(Q)
09-15-08, 12:31 PM
India brought us the Harijans.

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 12:32 PM
Son of God? Really?

nietzschefan
09-15-08, 12:44 PM
I like some indian food. There IS some stuff inside the "normal" range of flavour. Indian food DOES have an ability to test the extremes though.

Went for lunch at work to an Indian restaurant, I was you know the "white guy", everyone at work and those that invited me were amazed I went. But I did have a "hankerin'" for some spicy chicken(perhaps Dr Lou is right you can get addicted).

It was the first time I had, what I describe as a "Sugar Bomb". They drop like a little breaded ball(already possessing 50% sugar no doubt) into a bowl of liquid SUGAR. Christ! I ate one and nearly became an instant diabetic. I was fucked up all afternoon, dizzy and shit.

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 12:49 PM
Thats a gulab jamun. Traditionally its made of milk proteins denatured with lemon and then drained of the whey and kneaded into balls then fried. Since the whey contains all the sugar [lactose] in the milk, you have to put them in sugar syrup to get a dessert.

However, in most restaurants they make it from flour, butter and milk powder and add sugar to the dough. Then fry it and dip it in sugar syrup. So its chock full of sugar. You are not supposed to eat the syrup. Take the jamun in the spoon and press it against the side of the dish to squeeze out the syrup, then have it.

And if you ever get the original ones, try them. They are called mawa gulab jamuns. Yummy!

http://deepann.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/gulab_jamun1.jpg

We used to get fresh mawa from Parsi Dairy Farm for it. Parsis make the best mawa.:p

edit: I have to make a correction. Mawa is semisolid evaporated milk, chenna is denatured milk, chenna is used for Bengali sweets. So you're right, the mawa jamuns would also be chock full of sugar! :D

UltiTruth
09-15-08, 01:44 PM
Yeah that's the classic retort from ignorant morons, and I'm explaining how it's bullshit.
I do find very hot food (especially indian) unpleasant, yes, all humans should, if you don't you have severely damaged taste buds and automatically are incapable of appreciating the subtle nuances of fine cuisine.
I don't see how that's something to be proud of.
You are living up to your name! :p
So is it your ruling all humans should find it unpleasant? I certainly have lost my taste buds now... I fail to appreciate the subtlety of a tasteless donut or tasteless subway food. :bawl:

kenworth
09-15-08, 01:56 PM
Oppenheimer quoted the Gita regarding the Manhattan Project:

We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, "Now I am become Death(Time), the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.


ive got that tattooed on my arm.
also if you are going to say india never invaded another country you would first have to define when india became a country.

kmguru
09-15-08, 02:02 PM
I
It was the first time I had, what I describe as a "Sugar Bomb". They drop like a little breaded ball(already possessing 50% sugar no doubt) into a bowl of liquid SUGAR. Christ! I ate one and nearly became an instant diabetic. I was fucked up all afternoon, dizzy and shit.

You must be a diabetic to start with. I used to eat them by the dozen when I was 20 years old...yum yum...

S.A.M.
09-15-08, 02:04 PM
ive got that tattooed on my arm.
also if you are going to say india never invaded another country you would first have to define when india became a country.

You can go by the last 60 years, if the previous n years stick in your craw.

Gustav
09-15-08, 02:19 PM
i have this nagging suspicion that small eggs are getting smaller

/suspicious

Gustav
09-15-08, 02:29 PM
i hate to speak ill of my aryan motherland but indian food looks like shit
aesthetically unappealing
tastes ok tho

i thought it was the southerners that spiced their shit up

oh
subway's coldcut combo rules

nietzschefan
09-15-08, 03:42 PM
That was it, gulab jamun. Kmguru, your people have become immune to diabetes probably, like my people became immune to Vodka.

I actually was worried after that, and got checked out, I'm not diabetic ... :shrug:

shorty_37
09-15-08, 04:35 PM
India has added a whole new fashion craze to Canada. For instance they wear a winter coat over a saris and flip flops in the winter.

Getting back to the cuisine. My son brought home his lunch a few times because he said the Indian girls lunch next to him smelled so bad he felt like
vomiting, so he lost his appetite.

UltiTruth
09-16-08, 02:42 PM
Getting back to the cuisine. My son brought home his lunch a few times because he said the Indian girls lunch next to him smelled so bad he felt like
vomiting, so he lost his appetite.
Any news of what happened to the Indian girls after they sat next to your son, shorty?

Are you saying he felt like vomiting seeing his own food in comparison, and then lost appetite? Did he regain it? Sorry I am a little slow in these things.

John99
09-16-08, 02:46 PM
oh
subway's coldcut combo rules

and who makes them?;)

Mr. Hamtastic
09-16-08, 02:48 PM
India has done something useful? When? They built a cool house, no wait, that was a tomb. They have sent alot of doctors to the US to work with the underprivileged.

kenworth
09-16-08, 03:57 PM
You can go by the last 60 years, if the previous n years stick in your craw.

that was what i was getting at,not to be picky but if we are using that timeline we can include a whole lot of other countries.
india is at the top of my list of places i want to go along with cuba,portugal and china.i just hate it when people jerk off about a country like it can do no wrong.

nietzschefan
09-16-08, 03:59 PM
Any news of what happened to the Indian girls after they sat next to your son, shorty?

Are you saying he felt like vomiting seeing his own food in comparison, and then lost appetite? Did he regain it? Sorry I am a little slow in these things.

Yeah he ate dinner that night, his lunch was untouched for two days. He eats his lunch away from her now(I think everyone might eat their lunch away from her).

kenworth
09-16-08, 04:02 PM
Yeah he ate dinner that night, his lunch was untouched for two days. He eats his lunch away from her now(I think everyone might eat their lunch away from her).

not liking the smell of someone elses lunch makes you a racist.i wouldve thought you'd realized this you dirty nazi.

nietzschefan
09-16-08, 04:25 PM
not liking the smell of someone elses lunch makes you a racist.i wouldve thought you'd realized this you dirty nazi.

Why the hate?

kenworth
09-16-08, 04:27 PM
Why the hate?


my brother was raped by a curry:bawl:

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 04:29 PM
that was what i was getting at,not to be picky but if we are using that timeline we can include a whole lot of other countries.
india is at the top of my list of places i want to go along with cuba,portugal and china.i just hate it when people jerk off about a country like it can do no wrong.

Sure, but you have to remember, that before western nationalism, there was no notion of country, but Indians have always considered all people on the other side of the Indus as "our people" [desis]; probably because of the historical implications of the Mahabharata and Ramayana. Its how all foreign people from the Chinese who came to Nalanda to the Mughals have described us.

kenworth
09-16-08, 04:31 PM
Sure, but you have to remember, that before western nationalism, there was no country, but Indians have always considered all people on the other side of the Indus as "our people"; probably because of the historical implications of the Mahabharata and Ramayana.

i am mainly going on the only period of history of india that i know anything about which is the 18-19th century so i could easily be wrong.seems like it was kind of a loose collective that was known as india but made up of independant states.

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 04:33 PM
You should look up the Gupta and Maurya Empires. Asoka's Empire. The Delhi Sultanates.

The Persians and Arabs have written extensively about India [tamar hind or the Indian date is their name for tamarind]. The word Hindiya was used by them [and Sindus by the Persians] to designate Indians.

kenworth
09-16-08, 04:37 PM
You should look up the Gupta and Maurya Empires. Asoka's Empire. The Delhi Sultanates.

The Persians and Arabs have written extensively about India [tamar hind or the Indian date is their name for tamarind]. The word Hindiya was used by them [and Sindus by the Persians] to designate Indians.

was that to designate them as a race rather than a country though?

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 04:38 PM
It was based on the river Indus. Everyone on the other side of the Indus was a Hindi. Even today, Saudis and other Middle Eastern people call us as Hindis. "anti hindiya?" Did not matter that I was a Muslim. Hindiya to them is synonymous with Indian.

kenworth
09-16-08, 04:41 PM
It was based on the river Indus. Everyone on the other side of the Indus was a Hindi. Even today, Saudis call us as Hindis. "anti hindiya?"

yeah,i get what you mean.im asking whether the other side of the indus was a nation or just a race of people.the difference between race and nationality is vast.

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 04:47 PM
Ah, there was no concept of nationality then. They considered the Muslim Delhi Sultanate Kings as Hindiya for instance. More in terms of tribe, I believe.

kenworth
09-16-08, 04:53 PM
Ah, there was no concept of nationality then. They considered the Muslim Delhi Sultanate Kings as Hindiya for instance. More in terms of tribe, I believe.

k.,will have a look.india seems to me like something you can never get to the bottom of.
lot of similarities between india and japan in terms of religion and rule as far as i can tell.also between japan and england.
i always get over excited talking about it with students and end up with a vacant look.have had a couple of students (shinto priest and a couple of buddist monks) who were very interesting to talk to tho.

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 05:02 PM
India is in the unique position of having too many diverse peoples. Which is why its hard to define us in terms of colour race and tribe. Or even nationality and religion. Its just a way of thinking I guess. With the sea on three sides and mountains on the fourth, its easier to define us by geography.

Could you recommend a good book on Japan's history?

kmguru
09-16-08, 05:06 PM
Getting back to the cuisine. My son brought home his lunch a few times because he said the Indian girls lunch next to him smelled so bad he felt like vomiting, so he lost his appetite.

Smell of food is aquired. If you cook a goose egg or an egg from a free range chicken, I am sure your son will throw up. Same for hot and sour soup in China. How about sea slugs - which is a gourmet cuisine there....may be monekey brains or anchovies.......:D

kenworth
09-16-08, 05:18 PM
India is in the unique position of having too many diverse peoples. Which is why its hard to define us in terms of colour race and tribe. Or even nationality and religion. Its just a way of thinking I guess. With the sea on three sides and mountains on the fourth, its easier to define us by geography.

Could you recommend a good book on Japan's history?

umm.it depends on if you want the rosy view or the cynical view...
an actually good book about japans recent political history and power structure is "the enigma of japanese power" by karel van wolferen,as far as i can tell it presents a fairly unbiased view of the way japanese society works.lots of people absolutely hate it though,it is incredibly negative....however i think if you were to write this kind of book about any country it would be kinda similiar.

i dont think i can recommend any particular books for japans history ,most of what i know i have picked up from trips and conversations.i would definately advise against reading a book written by someone who has not lived here though,the romanticism of japan often seems to cloud the facts.

if you want a comprehensive view of japan you should look for a book written by a non-japanese,non-north american writer who has lived in japan for at least 5 years.

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 05:22 PM
I don't care if its rosy or cynical. I heard that the Japanese have rewritten their history and I'm interested in some more objective viewpoint.

Dr Lou Natic
09-16-08, 05:50 PM
They have sent alot of doctors to the US to work with the underprivileged.
Unqualified doctors that harm people, and get fat on the teet of america while they do it, hard to say that's a "contribution".

S.A.M.
09-16-08, 06:41 PM
Smell of food is aquired. If you cook a goose egg or an egg from a free range chicken, I am sure your son will throw up. Same for hot and sour soup in China. How about sea slugs - which is a gourmet cuisine there....may be monekey brains or anchovies.......:D

Yeah, the first time I smelled Dutch poached fish, I gagged. Made me light headed it was so odorous. The first time I smelled Australian lamb cooking, I wanted to throw up, it smells and tastes [I had to be polite] like sweat. The first time I smelled Filipino fish sauce, I ran away. :p

Orleander
09-16-08, 06:47 PM
Didn't MLK learn about passive resistance from Ghandi?

And what the hell is it in Indian food that gives me a buzz. I can only eat it for supper. If I try to eat lunch at the Indian restaurant I go back to work buzzed and giggley. I love the peas that are in the cream sauce. yummy!

Orleander
09-16-08, 06:48 PM
Yeah he ate dinner that night, his lunch was untouched for two days. He eats his lunch away from her now(I think everyone might eat their lunch away from her).

But don't lots of kids smell? Or is it only the Indian kids that smell?
I remember a kid we had in our school and you could watch the lice jump up and down on his head. We all made his life miserable.
If only I had it to do over. :(

Mr. Hamtastic
09-16-08, 07:41 PM
I know Orleander. Why were you so cruel to me? They weren't lice, they were fleas. I had to sleep with the dogs. I almost killed myself in school because of you. Why? Did it make you feel superior or something? I just wanted a friend. Where were you then, HUH!? :mad:

kmguru
09-16-08, 07:50 PM
Unqualified doctors that harm people, and get fat on the teet of america while they do it, hard to say that's a "contribution".

Definitely...but this one may be different...


BANGALORE: The world’s largest chipmaker, Intel, on Tuesday unveiled its latest microprocessor for servers, designed entirely by its Bangalore team and developed in a record two years. The Intel R&D centre in Bangalore designed the Xeon 7400 series processor and it marked the first time that work on the 45 nanometre technology was taken up by the company outside its US home base. The six-core microprocessor is based on Intel’s x86 architecture.

Gustav
09-16-08, 10:13 PM
Did not matter that I was a Muslim.

see?
fuck the arabs
fuck em all

Mr. Hamtastic
09-17-08, 08:19 AM
My wife works at an indoor playground for kids. You can book a party there. Completely unaware of this thread, she began complaining to me over the phone about the "Damned Indians" with their"Weird, too-long names" and the fact that apparently they had three parties of them in seperate rooms last night, and after letting the rooms air out over night, and disinfecting th rooms, there was still this cloying odor that makes her want to gag. Her words-"It's not so much a dirty, unwashed smell, but a dirty, unwashed, covered up by something dead smell."

I am now VERY curious about the hygiene habits of your average Indian.

UltiTruth
09-17-08, 01:58 PM
Ha ha ha, what a coincidence.
Indians think exactly this of Americans!

S.A.M.
09-17-08, 02:02 PM
My wife works at an indoor playground for kids. You can book a party there. Completely unaware of this thread, she began complaining to me over the phone about the "Damned Indians" with their"Weird, too-long names" and the fact that apparently they had three parties of them in seperate rooms last night, and after letting the rooms air out over night, and disinfecting th rooms, there was still this cloying odor that makes her want to gag. Her words-"It's not so much a dirty, unwashed smell, but a dirty, unwashed, covered up by something dead smell."

I am now VERY curious about the hygiene habits of your average Indian.

Actually we have a habit of peeing and crapping in the water and then flinging it all about ourselves. Thats probably it.


Ha ha ha, what a coincidence.
Indians think exactly this of Americans!

You're not supposed to tell them!:p

(Q)
09-17-08, 06:09 PM
Actually we have a habit of peeing and crapping in the water and then flinging it all about ourselves. Thats probably it.

Ah yes, just another day on the banks of the Ganges river. :D

S.A.M.
09-17-08, 06:13 PM
I was thinking of the Mumbai monsoons.

(Q)
09-17-08, 06:19 PM
"Known as Ganga Ma—Mother Ganges—the river is revered as a goddess whose purity cleanses the sins of the faithful and aids the dead on their path toward heaven. But while her spiritual purity has remained unchallenged for millennia, her physical purity has deteriorated as India’s booming population imposes an ever-growing burden upon her.

The majority of the Ganges’ pollution is organic waste—sewage, trash, food, and human and animal remains."

http://www.sacredland.org/world_sites_pages/Ganges.html

It looks like "faith" in gods has taken yet another victim.

S.A.M.
09-17-08, 06:23 PM
Thats the least of it. Some places, they get water only once a week, by tanker.

http://www.drinkingwaterforindia.org/

Medicine*Woman
09-17-08, 06:47 PM
*************
M*W: The Indian peoples are a great people. They are innovators, scientists, and honorable in so many ways. The Indians I know are brilliant, kind and caring. I never noticed an odor when I've been around them. In fact, some of the sexiest Indian physicians wear the finest perfume I have ever sensed. They are also sweet and funny, but take their work seriously. They are the greatest of thinkers. I have no problems with my Hindu and Muslim Indian friends. It's just S.A.M. who is different.

Buffalo Roam
09-17-08, 06:47 PM
BBC ON THIS DAY | 6 | 1965: Indian Army invades W Pakistan
Indian troops have invaded West Pakistan, crossing the border at three points in an attack which appears to be aimed mainly at the city of Lahore.

news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/septem... - 32k - Similar pages

kmguru
09-17-08, 07:12 PM
I am now VERY curious about the hygiene habits of your average Indian.

And not long names? Here in Louisiana, blacks have weird names that is difficult to spell so that their records can be retrieved such as

Taqueishha, Deanna, Quamoshuui....Shuanique etc.

Indian hygiene is for kids are same as American, but Indian adult hygiene is better than most American adults. Like taking bath one or two times a day, brushing teeth twice a day including cleaning tongue which no American does it.

We had an young Indian couple as friend. The lady was a vegetarian, yet there was this smell - the body odor. I think certain spices produce certain body odor. She was from Gujurat, so they use spices that are different from say Bengalis.

I think, one can tell what part the Indians are from by the body odor. North-East area use spices sparingly than south and west.

Basically the spices are the culprit....Go to any Indian store, you can immidiately tell...but this has nothing to do about hygiene standards. Besides, spices reduce Alzheimers, Cancer etc....

Orleander
09-17-08, 07:43 PM
So the odor could be the spices coming through the skin and not be due to uncleanliness?
It would be nice if parents would tell their children that so they don't continue a stereotype.

I vaguely remember the same kind of things being said about black kids when I was young.

kmguru
09-17-08, 08:03 PM
Yes, it is definitely spices. I have an Indian friend who married a blonde. They eat mostly American food and Indian sweets. I can smell the cardamom and cloves...but that is about it...

thunderblade
08-14-10, 11:37 AM
first of all u guys need to realize that Indian food is good....
the part where it is spicy then u need 2 understand is that the taste and bodies of Indian people are accustomed to this kind of food...
because to our tongues ur food appears to be dull and tasteless.....
but that is just biology so cant blame anyone........
then again u need 2 respect 2 each and every culture and stop being hostile...
hostility shows anger and anger shows ignorance, so stop being ignorant and open ur minds a little...
before speaking anything u guys really need to research facts with respect to variables involved with them and then come out with conclusions....
so i really request u all to be a little polite and considerate....
because the behavior u just showed is exactly the kind that makes us perceive that westerners are hostile and aggressive.....
it would be awesome indeed if u break this perception......
respect yourself, respect others, jai hind...........

Enmos
08-14-10, 01:10 PM
Thread necromancy.. tsk!