View Full Version : Drug can reverse Alzheimer's symptoms in minutes


sandy
01-10-08, 09:45 AM
A drug used for arthritis can reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer's "in minutes". It appears to tackle one of the main features of the disease - inflammation in the brain. Enbrel is injected into the spine where it blocks a chemical responsible for damaging the brain and other organs.

A pilot study carried out by U.S. researchers found one patient had his symptoms reversed "in minutes"....:)

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23431610-details/Drug%20'can%20reverse%20Alzheimer's%20symptoms%20i n%20minutes'/article.do

I love science. :)

newtonFan
01-10-08, 01:57 PM
An isolated case? Reproducible?

Enmos
01-10-08, 01:59 PM
A drug used for arthritis can reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer's "in minutes". It appears to tackle one of the main features of the disease - inflammation in the brain. Enbrel is injected into the spine where it blocks a chemical responsible for damaging the brain and other organs.

A pilot study carried out by U.S. researchers found one patient had his symptoms reversed "in minutes"....:)

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23431610-details/Drug%20'can%20reverse%20Alzheimer's%20symptoms%20i n%20minutes'/article.do

I love science. :)

Great !
But isn't this just dumb luck ?

Kadark
01-10-08, 08:36 PM
Let's see how the smack daddy pharmaceutical companies discredit this drug.

sandy
01-10-08, 08:42 PM
I don't know. I only know what I read. My passion for neuroscience has cooled dramatically.

Read-Only
01-10-08, 09:35 PM
Let's see how the smack daddy pharmaceutical companies discredit this drug.

???? Why should they? Currently, there's NOTHING that can cure it so they won't be loosing ANY money. But if it does work, several will be trying to get their version of it to market.

Care to explain just why you said that? :bugeye:

Asguard
01-10-08, 10:07 PM
sandy, that was a very small sample and it is also only treating on aspect of the disease. Its not treating the atropy of the brain (although it maybe proposing that this is caused by the swelling) and its not treating the plaques. Maybe this in combination with a blood thinning medication and a derivitive of THC may work though. But it is still a VERY small sample

Read-Only
01-10-08, 10:38 PM
sandy, that was a very small sample and it is also only treating on aspect of the disease. Its not treating the atropy of the brain (although it maybe proposing that this is caused by the swelling) and its not treating the plaques. Maybe this in combination with a blood thinning medication and a derivitive of THC may work though. But it is still a VERY small sample

Neither Sandy nor anyone else has claimed it was more than a small sample. At this point it's just news and a LOT more testing WILL be done. The main thing, though, is that it was a completely unexpected result of threatment with that particular drug AND it appears to hold some degree of promise at this point. Give it time!!

Also, there is NO swelling with Alzheimer's - I don't know where you got that from. :shrug:

Asguard
01-10-08, 10:41 PM
"inflammation in the brain" what do you think inflammation is?

Read-Only
01-10-08, 11:22 PM
"inflammation in the brain" what do you think inflammation is?

Even though that was mentioned in the lead-off of the article, that had to be something the non-medically trained reporter inserted. While it could be termed "inflammation" in a non-specific sense, it does NOT refer to swelling. I suggest you do a little research on your own -you will find there is no swelling of the brain associated with the condition.

Asguard
01-10-08, 11:28 PM
sure if it was just a reporter mestake then fine because your right everything i have herd about Alzheimers refers to A) plaque build up, B) brain atopine and C) denigration of the myline sheaths although b and c maybe the samething

Have read that THC has the ability to break up the plaque build ups though they are still reacherching that

Read-Only
01-11-08, 12:01 AM
sure if it was just a reporter mestake then fine because your right everything i have herd about Alzheimers refers to A) plaque build up, B) brain atopine and C) denigration of the myline sheaths although b and c maybe the samething

Exactly right - and that's why I said the reporter was just that - a reporter, not a medical person.


Have read that THC has the ability to break up the plaque build ups though they are still reacherching that

I haven't come acrosr that one, do you have a link?

Asguard
01-11-08, 12:18 AM
no i dont sorry, it was reported in the health report on ABC radio. I will try to find an artical on it though

Klippymitch
01-19-08, 02:21 PM
It seems to me that this is not a cure but a treatment, but hey its an improvement. I just wish they would allow the use of marijuana to the patients.

Klippymitch
01-19-08, 02:25 PM
Exactly right - and that's why I said the reporter was just that - a reporter, not a medical person.



I haven't come acrosr that one, do you have a link?

http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=7003

Exhumed
01-19-08, 02:49 PM
What is atopine?

Asguard
01-19-08, 03:06 PM
its a spelling error, unfortuantly i cant find the correct spelling.
It basically refers to shrinking because of wasting away, like if you suddenly stop using your mussles. It can also happen to the brain but with old age and especially with someone with Alzheimers

Nickelodeon
01-19-08, 03:07 PM
atrophy

Asguard
01-19-08, 03:16 PM
hey that IS how i spelt it so now i am confused as to the question
were you refering to this?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atropine

"[edit] Resuscitation
Injections of atropine are used in the treatment of bradycardia (an extremely low heart rate), asystole and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in cardiac arrest. This works because the main action of the vagus nerve of the parasympathetic system on the heart is to slow it down. Atropine blocks that action and therefore may speed up the heart rate. The usual dose of atropine is 0.5 to 1 mg every three to five minutes, up to a maximum dose of 3 mg.

Atropine is also useful in treating first degree heart block, second degree heart block Mobitz Type 1 (Wenckebach block), and also third degree heart block with a high Purkinje or AV-nodal escape rhythm. It is usually not effective in second degree heart block Mobitz type 2, and in third degree heart block with a low Purkinje or ventricular escape rhythm. Atropine is contraindicated in ischemia-induced conduction block, because the drug increases oxygen demand of the AV nodal tissue, thereby aggravating ischemia and the resulting heart block.

One of the main actions of the parasympathetic nervous system is to stimulate the M2 muscarinic receptor in the heart, but atropine inhibits this action."

Hercules Rockefeller
01-19-08, 04:30 PM
hey that IS how i spelt it

No, it isn't.

'Atrophy' is the word you meant to say but that you spelt incorrectly.

kmguru
01-19-08, 05:11 PM
Why Alzheimer- many hypothesis

1. Plaques and Tangles noted by German Psychiatrist Alois Alzhemer
2. Amyloid cascade hypotheis based on Amyloid Precursor protein causing Beta-Amyloid Plaque
3. Tau protein in association with phosphate metabolism
3. Antioxidant hypothesis
4. Inflammatory hypothesis
5. Excitatory Cell Death (ECD) hypothesis
6. Viral infection such as herpes hypothesis
7. Vascular hypothesis (poor blood flow?)
8. Diabetes Hypothesis (this is a strong one)
9. Vitamin deficiency like B12
10. Hypercalcemia
11. Syphilis
12. Pesticides that pass blood-brain barrier

Hey, if they found an easy solution, that is fantastic!

sandy
01-19-08, 05:57 PM
You left out genetics. Every Alz patient I have ever met had it in his/her heritage.

kmguru
01-19-08, 06:04 PM
I am glad, none in my family heritage...

kmguru
01-19-08, 07:13 PM
Some other ideas since Enabrel has a lot of side effects:

According to the news:

The experiment showed that Enbrel can deactivate TNF (tumour necrosis factor) - a chemical in the fluid surrounding the brain that is found in Alzheimer's sufferers.

My references show:

Is there a role for melatonin in the treatment of neoplastic cachexia?

It is known that neoplastic cachexia shows metabolic characteristics different from other common causes of malnutrition, and that it is mainly due to an abnormal secretion of TNF, whose levels are often high in patients with advanced neoplasia. Previous clinical studies have suggested that the pineal hormone melatonin (MLT), which plays an essential role in the neuroendocrine regulation of biological systems, may improve the clinical status of advanced cancer patients and inhibit TNF secretion. To investigate the relationship between MLT, TNF and cancer-related weight loss, 100 untreatable metastatic solid tumor patients entered this study to receive either supportive care alone, or supportive care plus MLT (20 mg/day orally in the evening). Patients were observed for 3 months, and were considered evaluable when they were observed for at least 2 months. There were 86 evaluable patients, the other 14 patients having died from rapid progression of disease. The per cent of weight loss greater than 10% was significantly higher in patients treated by supportive care alone than in those concomitantly treated by MLT, with no difference in food intake (P < 0.01). Mean serum levels of TNF progressively increased in the supportive care group, but to levels that were not significantly different from pretreatment values. In contrast, TNF mean concentrations significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in patients concomitantly treated by MLT. These results suggest that the pineal hormone MLT may be effective in the treatment of the neoplastic cachexia by decreasing TNF blood concentrations.

Eur J Cancer 1996 Jul;32A(8):1340-3

sandy
01-19-08, 07:34 PM
I am glad, none in my family heritage...

Me neither. It is an awful illness. :(

Hercules Rockefeller
01-19-08, 10:21 PM
You left out genetics.


Just what do you think genes are? What exactly do you think they do?

sandy
01-20-08, 07:24 AM
Just what do you think genes are? What exactly do you think they do?

I didn't see that in the OP. I saw a list of hypotheses.

Fraggle Rocker
01-20-08, 01:32 PM
Have read that THC has the ability to break up the plaque build ups though they are still reacherching thatHere's a link. Scripps is a very well-respected institution. If anybody is going to finally bust the damn government over its attitude about drugs, it will probably happen in California, the home of medical marijuana.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Marijuana-Compound-Efficient-against-Alzheimer-s-Disease-37410.shtml

kmguru
01-20-08, 05:00 PM
I bet you, some Pharmaceutical company will make THC in a pill form like Loretab and sell it at high price.

Hercules Rockefeller
01-20-08, 06:00 PM
I didn't see that in the OP. I saw a list of hypotheses.


No, you’re missing my point. Your addition of “genetics” to a list of biochemical causes is erroneous. Genes code for the production of proteins. It’s the proteins that do the biochemical work in cells. Of course genetic predisposition can be an underlying risk factor of AD, but genetic predisposition acts through one or more of the physiological mechanisms on that list.

sandy
01-20-08, 06:05 PM
Ok. Gotcha. Duh. Remember, I am blonde. :rolleyes: :D